spraying in the shop

I need to spray a lot of small pieces of trim. Given the temperatures and humidity in central Illinois, I was thinking of setting up a cardboard ( re frigerator boxes) spray booth. I am spraying Hydrocote using an 4 stage Fu ji gun. Anybody out there done this without coating all your big tools?
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Here's a thought... temporary plastic greenhoues: (Amazon.com product link shortened)
Here's one for around $100.
That should contain any overspray (and concentrate vapors--so take extra precautions!) so you don't have to cover all your big tools.
If you decide to give this a try, I'd love to hear how it went. (You could probably actually build one out of plastic sheeting and 2x4s for around half the price.)
Puckdropper
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On 28 Nov 2015 23:57:26 GMT, Puckdropper

The thing that would worry me about the plastic sheeting (or the greenhouse, for that matter) is fire. Plastic sheeting burns good and when it does, the fumes are toxic.
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On Saturday, November 28, 2015 at 5:08:41 PM UTC-6, Len wrote:

d humidity in central Illinois, I was thinking of setting up a cardboard ( refrigerator boxes) spray booth. I am spraying Hydrocote using an 4 stage Fuji gun. Anybody out there done this without coating all your big tools?
I have a different take on this type of problem. When I am doing the same thing, I use what I think of as a clothesline. For example, I recently add ed a contrasting color of crown molding around a kitchen full of cabinets. Some pieces were long, a lot were short. The long ones I put across sawhors es and sprayed them. I don't like spray pieces laying flat as they are too attractive to bugs for an easy landing, settling dust, falling leaves, etc . So the long pieces are sprayed and taken back in the house.
The clothesline comes into play when I run the longest piece of rope that I can inside the client's garage (or on a porch, etc.). I literally take a piece of the same rope and string it somewhere else away from the house so I don't have to worry about overspray and drift when spraying. I put brad, hook of some sort, even a bent nail in the trims to hang them on the short rope in the yard and then spray them. They stay hanging in the protected area until they dry.
Remember, the humidity only affects the >drying< or the curing of your fini sh, not the application. Mix your finish inside the protected area, walk o ut with the gun, start shooting. Remove the air supply from the gun and wa lk your sprayed pieces back to the drying area. I do this same thing when spraying drawer fronts, cabinet doors, trims, and anything else I can't spr ay in place.
I hate spray cabinets, booths, tents, or hoods. Fumes scare me, and I hate to deal with overspray, so I always spray outside and make as many trips a s needed to handle my materials.
I had the Fuji setup you have and used it for years. It is a great machine and certainly served me well for years using the method described above.
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On Sat, 28 Nov 2015 17:06:12 -0800 (PST)

but temperature also matters and OP noted that as well as humidity where they are
some products like warmer temps and say so
hydrocote says not below 55 does this method work at low temperatures or do you do something different
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On 12/1/2015 9:54 AM, Electric Comet wrote:

Now that is an interesting response, the novice picking at the "MASTERS" comments.
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On 11/28/2015 5:08 PM, Len wrote:

Go for it.
This particular project a couple of years back was an example of doing just that as the large plaque for a customer needed to be sprayed very carefully, and expertly, as the finish needed to be approved by the client before paying ... and an expert in finishing I am certainly not.
Just moved all the machinery against the walls, covered them in plastic and used the overhead doors rails as a "clothes hanger".
If it hadn't been for Robert's (nailshooter41) expert advice, via numerous phone calls and emails, in mitigating my lack of expertise in both choosing, and spraying, the correct product to get the desired finish, and HVLP's lack of overspray, it would have turned out badly.
In short, had to use the entire shop as a spray booth to get the job done, but it worked out fine, with no damage to any of the considerable number of shop tools you can see in some of the photos ... where there's a need, there's a way.
https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/EWoodShopPlaque?noredirect=1#
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