Spindle Sanders

I want to buy a spindle sander and have look at alot of them. Jet, Delta,Rigid. Which one do you have and why. Thanks
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Jet. HP, 4" diameter spindle, heavy.
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Hey Leon... webucate me please... What applications do you use a spindle sander, and why.. I've looked at them and I guess until I see one in use, I fail to see what I'd use one for..
mac
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It is certainly a luxury item that you can use other tools to do the job. However for the obvious it sands inside curves very well. Mine has the optional larger spindle that is on the sander a majority of the time. I use it all the time for those odd sanding situations where you need to add a gentle free form curve. It is great for removing band saw tooth marks on curved surfaces. I find that I often use it to take a rough edge off of a piece of metal or plastic. It is the kind of tool that you may not use it with every project however I certainly don't shy away from those projects that may have some intricate detail scroll work sanding. If you cut your own dowel pins to reinforce joints it is great for slightly flattening the side of the dowel so that glue or air can escape. Until I added a 12" disk sander I also used the spindle sander to chamfer the ends of those dowels.
Between the oscillating spindle sander and the disk sander it is much easier to for small pieces that you need to hold with your hand and precisely sand as both are virtually vibration free.

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Thanks, Leon...
I seems like once again, the poor old Shopsmith is doing it job.. If I understand you, the spindle sander is like my drum sander, but "strokes" up and down in stead of rotating??
The SS is pretty much permanently set up as a horizontal DP and has the 12" sanding disk on the other end... the DP end is pretty much used for drilling pen blanks or drum sanding.. I also have a 4 x 36" belt sander...
Then again, your comment about "almost vibration free" is appealing..

mac
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On Sun, 11 Nov 2007 09:08:25 -0800, mac davis

It does both simultaneously.
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Chuck Taylor
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wrote:

Hmm... I'm going to have to see on in action... sounds interesting..
Then again, I can't think of anything I do now that it would help.. Maybe I just need to be doing the right project to see the need for one..
mac
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Roy wrote:

Ridgid oscillating sander. I use the belt more than the spindles. Works for me.     smoothly,     jo4hn
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Roy wrote:

You don't say what kind of operation you're running--if it's small volume go with the Ridgid--nothing else like it on the market for a reasonable price. Does everything any other oscillating spindle sander does and has the oscillating belt besides--I seldom put a spindle on it, usually use the belt. Note that both the spindles and the belt are standard sizes that you can get from Sears or Klingspor or a number of other sources--I got a box of belts from Klingspor that will probably last me the rest of my life.
One thing to watch out for--as soon as you get it out of the box check the platen for flatness--it's not going to be absolutely flat but it shouldn't have a bump or valley in the middle big enough to suggest that a shim was left out or doubled--if it does then swap it out (unless you feel like fixing it yourself).
Also, if you're using grits finer than what comes with it, keep an eye on the temperature of the belt--the fine grits can heat up fast.
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On Fri, 9 Nov 2007 22:46:26 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Roy) wrote:

I just ordered a Jet JOVS-10 with mobile base (to arrive next week!). Ten different spindle sizes from 1/4" to 4", long stroke, warranty, 45-degree tilt, good name, nice-machined cast-iron top, heavy, DC port. I almost bought a Grizzly 1071 for a little less money, but got a good deal on the Jet. I thought the benchtop Rigid has good versatility for smaller pieces of wood, although flimsy, lightweight, the local HD lacks sleeves. The benchtop Clayton is quality. You have lots of sizes, prices, features, weights, levels-of-quality to choose. For Jet check out http://www.wmhtoolgroup.com
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On Fri, 9 Nov 2007 22:46:26 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Roy) wrote:

I have the Ridgid because in addition to the spindle it also converts into a stationary belt sander. ROY!
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I've got the benchtop Jet, and it's a good one. If I had to do it again, I'd buy it. Works well for sanding curves you can't get at with a spokeshave, and since I also do salad sets, I make the tines far enough apart to use the smallest to sand between. No substitute suitable unless you can get someone to work the handle on the DP for you.
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