Sorby bevel angle

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Thanks. I'd been kind of kicking that one around, mentally. I am going to be looking for some larger planes (#5, #6, #7, and maybe #8) here in the near future to bring up to snuff and use for some projects, and I was wondering how exactly I was supposed to lap the soles of these beasts on a 12x12" tile, or even on the 14x14" glass bread board I use now for Scary Sharp, and the idea of multiple strips of 8.5x11" sheets of sandpaper was starting to look questionable as well. I may have to look around for some belts and some plate glass scraps and give it a try.

Noted ;p
nuk
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I was working in a place some years ago where we had a need to lap a great many parts. We took a belt from the sander,cut it and stuck it down to a 6 foot granite surface plate. When a part came out of the machine, all you had to do was put it on the paper and walk it to the other end of the plate.
I may have to

grit
way
anyone
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SNIP
I use a marble window sill that was taken out of my mother's house when some remodeling was done. It is probably 4' long and maybe 5" or so wide. When lapping, a sanding belt can be glued to it. For sharpening, all the various grits from 80 to 2000 can be glued on in a line. I assume that these can probably be found (cheap) many places where you see a demolition going on.
Dave Hall
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Yes. I do have a better method. Take that granite plate (or piece of glass), clean it well, spray with Photomount and stick the abrasive sheet (sandpaper) of your choice to it. Your rock will last virtually forever this way.
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will
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yep it will wear them both out. You need a softer substrate to hold the grit. glass would be better as you can change it with little cost. but it is really too hard to work well. that's way lapping plates are mild steel or cast iron or aluminum or other soft material. they still wear but it is far slower.
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The question I have in this thread is powder better than sandpaper? I'm sure it must be messier.
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No. I could go into the history of the process but it will suffice to say that abrasive paper has almost completely replaced loose abrasive for lapping. Reason being the far higher quality of bonded abrasive available compared to the past.

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So I am guessing that this why the Lee Valley sharpening kit provides mylar films to place on their glass lapping plate? Softer surface to hold the grit? Sounds reasonable. Similar concept to scary sharp using sandpaper. I assume both methods also eliminate the wear on the plate itself.
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Like
feature?
grit.
really
iron or

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