So what do you do with your planer chips?

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Had a few pieces of furniture to make, so went by the sawmill and bought 70 bdft of cherry. Saw mill (also a friend) gives me two prices, $1.50 if I take it as it comes off the stack, and he'll decide later if I pick and choose. So I take it as it comes off the stack, knowing my yield will be about 50-60%
Why do I always do that?
So I spend two days cutting to rough length, edge jointing, ripping to get most of the cup out, face jointing, planing, then rejointing to square it up, then ripping it true getting ready to glue up my panels, working around knots, splits, sapwood, and thin spots where my buddy got a little off with his portable sawmill.
I end up with my good wood, two five gallon buckets of fireplace kindling, a bucket full of smoker chunks, a pile of shorts that will be mixed with other species to become multi-color cutting boards, and about a hundred gallons of chips from the machines, most of it planer shavings, which make the most volume.
So what do you do with your chips?
Frank
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Back where they came from. Fill a hole in the woods, or mulch your garden, drop them off to a community garden they will love them.
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There's this big compost pile behind the shed in the back corner of the property. That's where the hardwood chips go. Softwood goes onto the parts of the garden that need mulching, and can be easily fertilized.
Patriarch
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SWMBO uses them to mulch the veggie and flower gardens. Every now and again, I wind up with more than she can use. When that happens, I offer them on Freecycle, and they're usually gone within hours, and I have to turn many people away emptyhanded. Some folks use them for animal bedding, some for garden mulch. Some people stuff dolls. One of my customers is a seamstress; she used the planer shavings from the sewing tables I made for her to stuff a dressmaker's ham. I use them from time to time to soak up oil spills in the garage if we don't have any kitty litter handy. The uses are almost endless. :-)
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Recycling and composting is mandatory here so my planer shavings are donated to the municipality for their composting program.
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I have a big bag of them that I use to "scrub" the finish remover off of pieces that I am refinishing. I saw this on "The Furniture Guys" TV show. I use biodegradable orange stripper so the used chips go to the local landfill to use between trash layers. I also use them to clean up oil spills. Those I use with a little paraffin wax and cupcake holders to make firestarters.
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Gordon Parks
"Frank Boettcher" < snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net> wrote in message
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"Frank Boettcher" wrote:
> So what do you do with your chips?
Dumpster.
Lew
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On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 17:06:15 -0500, Frank Boettcher

My neighbor is a Boy Scout leader. He takes then to make fire starters as a group project.
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Some I use with egg cartons and wax to make fire starters. Most ends up in the landfill unfortunately. I'd like to use them as mulch or compost but they suck the nitrogen right out of the ground so then you're stuck fertilizing more. Seems like a catch 22 to me. I had 6 black trash bags full of sawdust/shavings that I recently had to pitch. Didn't like doing it but didn't see too many other alternatives here. Cheers, cc
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James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote:

Patience, patience. If you can wait until the decomposition is done, the nitrogen is (largely) returned to the soil.
I use them in my paths and move them onto the beds after they decompose. Voila .. 'instant compost'.
Bill
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If you compost them first, they won't "suck nitrogen right out of the ground".
Compost them with grass, kitchen scraps, coffee grounds/filters, teabags, fruit peels, etc. in a proper compost pile or composting container. Once composted apply to lawns, gardens, etc.
scott
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I haven't tried composting it first but I understand it takes an awfully long time to compost? I may give that a go on the next project if it's relatively quick. Composting here takes forever only for the fact that we're very dry and I hate using our precious water to keep the pile moist. Cheers, cc
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James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote:

Where ya at? There's more than one way to defur this particular feline.
Bill
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New Mexico.
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James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote:

Drop 'em down a post hole along with kitchen scraps. When they get full, cap 'em with a couple shovels full of whatever came out of the holes. Make a pattern of the post holes fairly close together and pretty soon you'll have a very fertile planting bed which will have enough organic material in it to hold moisture really well. Sounds like that's important to ya. ;-)
You might want to dig those holes with a soil auger or the next person who comes up the driveway looking for a handout ^h^h^h^h^h^h^h work. Bill
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Keep the pile enclosed. Home Depot, Lowes, OSH, etc. all carry composing bins of various forms. Doesn't take much water, and works best in warmer climes. I don't get rain from May through November. Use about 1/2 brown (i.e. dry: leaves, sawdust, chips) to 1/2 green (grass, kitchen scraps (not meat or fats), coffee grounds, teabags, etc). Mix weekly. Keep as moist as a squeezed out sponge, only add water if the moisture level drops below this, however you get a lot of moisture fom green grass and kitchen scraps. If the worms find the pile (or you add them), things will work even faster.
scott
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That might be an option. I built a composting bin but just gave up after seeing just how much water it took to keep it going. I'm seriously short on green as I don't cut our grass (blue grama, more of a meadow type grass that grows to 1-1 1/2 ft. tall) but I suppose I can figure something out. Cheers, cc
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On Mon, 30 Jul 2007 01:33:57 -0600, "James \"Cubby\" Culbertson"

Piss on it every day.
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Maybe not every day, don't want too much N. However, it does help to seed a new pile.
scott
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On Thu, 26 Jul 2007 17:06:15 -0500, Frank Boettcher

<snip>
Chips are used for muddy walkways or added to the compost. A 50/50 mix of grass clippings and wood chips will quickly decompose.
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