Smoothing planes and card scrapers

Page 2 of 2  

brianlanning wrote:

Hickory and hard maple are both hard enough that they can be difficult to plane, at least for someone who hasn't done much of it. On the other hand, they both are hard enough that they scrape well.
The scraper should be all you need to remove planer and jointer marks.
John Martin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You might also consider a scraper plane. For maple, as others have said, even a fine smoothing plane will be a challenge -- the scraper plane will be a better bet for the grain you will encounter with maple and will save your thumbs vs. trying to use a card scraper for everything.
+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I ordered a package of scraping related stuff from lee valley. Included int eh kit is a holder for the scraper that allows you to turn a thumb screw to set the amount of bend. That should make it much easier on the fingers.
brian
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I was in a woodworking class where we were building these coffee tables. One of the students made the top by laminating a 3 inch wide piece of ebony between two outer pieces of some other hardwood (forget the species - but it was a nice color combination). He used a newly purchased Lie-Nielson large scraper plane to finish the top, one of the reasons being that sanding would have potentially caused staining from the ebony onto the surrounding wood. Anyway, the result was absolutely beautiful. The finish was like glass.
- MB
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 24 Feb 2006 00:30:36 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Ebony scraper finishes _beautifully_, and quite easily.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Roy"

Where is that!? I can't find a local woodworking group here in SoCal!
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
i didn't read all the replys. there was a post a month or so ago about the diffs b/t planes of different qualities/quantities.
-
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I did not see the other.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's right there!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
brianlanning wrote:

Good answers above, but for smoothing a surface that's already been machine planed, you just want a smoother (using the stanley numbers):
1-4: smooth 5: jack 6: fore (sortofa anemic jointer) 7-8: jointer
The dimensions of these planes can be found on Patrick Leach's page:
    http://www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan1.htm
If you want a cheap plane you are better off with a cautious purchase of an old Stanley on ebay.
er
--
email not valid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's also way overpriced in Canada, even though LV says it's made here.
$25 US, $36 CAD. I called our local store, pointed out that the two currencies are onyl 15% apart.
djb
--
Do the right thing. It will gratify some people and astonish the rest.
- Mark Twain.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

If it wasn't for the postage, I'd send you one of mine.
The #45 is a turkey. Like all of those iron combination planes it has lousy cut quality. A rack of old wooden moulders might take up more space, but the results are incomparably better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.