slight OT: truck hauling capacity

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Tom Quackenbush wrote:

Jeez, I need to hire a proofreader.
Should have read:
Green wood certainly weighs more than seasoned wood, and it's also MORE dense (AFAIK - there may be some exceptions, but I doubt it).

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Dave Hinz wrote:

Using the figures from: http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/weigt-wood-9_821.html
20% MC walnut weighs 38 lbs /cu ft (same as your figure), green walnut weighs 57 lbs/ cu ft.
So the dry walnut has 81% the weight of green walnut, or looking at it the other way, green walnut weighs 50% more than the dry walnut.
R, Tom Q.
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Doh! 38/57 = 67%, NOT 81%

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his thinks probably goes....
if 20% MC weighs 38lbs /cu ft and green weighs 57lbs /cu ft,
then green weighs 57-38 lb more. ok so far?
ok, then 19 is 50% of 38.
so the 57lbs is 38lbs plus 50% of 38lbs (19lbs)
so 38lbs + 50% of 38lbs 8+19W.
so in a sense, the green (57lbs) is 20% MC plus 50% of the 20% MC.
wrote:

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Timothy Drouillard wrote:

Him is me.
The way you described is how I arrived at the 50% figure. From the point of view of the smaller figure, so to speak.
Just as valid is looking at it using the larger figure as the point of reference, which gives 67%. Unfortunately, I first said 81% instead of 67%. I should 've caught that, it's a pretty obvious mistake.
NO EXCUSE, SIR! <g>
R, Tom Q.
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no problem

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The traditional ton rating of trucks has long ago lost any value other than vague comparative. Just because a truck is called a half ton, or a 150, or a 1500, or whatever they call them tomorrow, does NOT mean that it can haul a half ton. In fact, it is probably higher than that, even on an import.
Check the ratings on your truck. Should be in the glove box, or the door frame, or RTFM.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com
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Pounds on Wood wrote:

has a 1/2 ton capacity. Depending on his model ( King Cab, Crew Cab, Short Bed, Long Bed ), 915 lbs to 1146 lbs max payload to be more specific.
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I don't believe the original poster's truck is what is considered a 1/2 ton truck. It is smaller than that.

The GVWR is listed on the door post usually, but GVWR opnly helps determine the load capacity if you know the empty weight of the truck.
Brian Elfert
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On 6/8/2005 4:34 PM Doug mumbled something about the following:

than one in the Nissan.
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Get a Toyota
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Bill D wrote:

A half ton is a half ton is a half ton. Capacity doesn't care who made it.
I've broken ( or fixed ) Toyota's, Nissans, Dodge's, Chevy's, GMC's and Fords all the same.
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Mark and Kim Smith wrote:

No they aren't, even of the same make. The carying capacity varies all over the place for different models, different makes, and different years. Ask the new car dealer for the specks for that model. What vehicle doesn't have the axle capacity listed on the door (or elsewhere)?
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George E. Cawthon wrote:

Let me rephrase. 1000 lbs is 1000 lbs. It doesn't matter what make the vehicle is, carrying that kind of weight around all the time will cause faster wear or breakage than not carrying that weight around.

Correct.
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Mark and Kim Smith wrote:

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You are quite correct. The Ford F150, for instance, has at least 6 different weight ratings, depending on whether it's 2 or 4 wheel drive, std or extended cab, short or long bed (the 4x4 extended cab having the lowest rating). All of those, of course, are "half-ton" models. (mine is rated 1700lbs, incidently, which is pretty generous for a "half ton").
To the OP: Edmunds.com gives specs for almost everything...look in their used car section and you can find at least the last 5 years worth of models.
Being that your's is a "small pickup" and not a "half-ton", you'll probably find the payload to be around 900 lbs. You _should_ subtract your weight from that to find what you can put in the bed, altho for a short haul you can ignore that.
John
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On Thu, 9 Jun 2005 21:10:18 +0000 (UTC), John McCoy

Actually "small" pickups like Fronties and Tacomas usually can deal with quite a bit more than 900 pounds.
The '04 V6 Frontier King Cab 4x4 capacity is 1164 according to Edmunds.
The same site lists an '04 Taco V6 4x4 extra cab capacity as over 1500. My '05 V6 4x4 Access Cab is spec'd at 1400.
Barry
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Yes, 1000 lb, but evenly distributed in the bed, like sand. Even the six footers will move the center toward the back of the bed, I expect. An 8 footer will really hit the back axle. I'd consider tenting a solid trailer that can carry them all at once and save the truck. Two of them could well bend the bed sides, if the width is not adequate. BTW, if you haul it to the mill the next move will be easier. Wilson

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One at a time if you want to be safe. If you're driving next to me I would like for you to be safe. Depending on the distance to travel you can rent a trailer or get a "rollback" wrecker to haul them for you. Robert
Doug wrote:

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them loaded/unloaded, and how far do you have to haul them? If you've got a front end loader or a backhoe to hoist them in, and they don't stretch the bed width, go for 2 @ a time if it's a short haul. If you're using muscle/winches, etc., one @ a time should be plenty, give you a chance to rest during the haul. If it's a short haul over decent road, go for 2, if it's rough travel or a long haul, stick with 1. What do YOU feel comfortable with? I've done short(15-20mi) hauls with my old '89 F150 full of sand, sitting right on the stop bumpers, just took it easy.
Just as long as it doesn't look like the Toyota I saw once. Had a cap on it, but they were headed into a city with a load of cantaloupe(sp?). Bed completely filled & piled as high as they could get under the cap. Rear bumper almost dragging the ground, rear tires squashed out to about 1/2 normal size. Wishing he would have to pull into the scale house like the real trucks.
Then there was the full size P/U I saw on I-5 in CA. Had three rolls of carpet hanging out the back, front tires just skimming the surface, and every little bump they'd leave the ground.
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Nahmie
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