Sliding Table vs new miter gauge for TS

A few questions regarding miter gauges for my Table Saw. Incra has a V27 that is reasonably priced miter gauge for about $60 but it only stops every 5 degrees and at 22.5. It is sufficient, or do I need to spend 2 or 3 times this price for a better miter gauge? Someone suggested that I keep the lousy TS supplied miter gauge and build a sliding table.
Need some wreck opinions please.
R
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On Wed, 31 Dec 2003 06:45:48 GMT, "Ron A"

its useless... spend a bit more money and get a decent mid range gauge.
that said, build a crosscut sled too, i use mine about as often as the miter gauge
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I agree w/Traves. I've got a good miter and a sliding table. I still prefer the sled for most cuts. For me it is the quickest way to get dead on 90 and 45 degree cuts. The sled is also great for minimizing tearout. That said, both the slider and miter are nice to have. Just if I had to pick one it would be the sled. Regarding the V27 - how often do you need more stops than it provides? If you need less than 5 degree get the Miter 1000 or 2000. I bought the Miter 2000 which has 1/2 degree stops but so far I haven't needed that. You might though. My .02.
"Traves W. Coppock" <newsgroups-AT-farmvalleywoodworks-DOT-com> wrote in message Crawled out of the shop and said. . .:

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Build a crosscut sled, mine put my miter gage and radial saw virtually out to pasture. http://webpages.charter.net/pminmo/wood1.htm It's light and easy to use.
Ron A wrote:

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Ron - I bought the Incra 1000 SE from Woodcraft when they had it on sale in Nov - I recently used it to miter end caps on a blanket chest - the angles I cut were perfect. I could never get them exactly right before, and ended up using a coping saw and butchering up the pieces to get them to fit.
I was looking at one of the online tool places just recently, and saw that you can get the 2000 for less than I paid for the 1000 SE - I definately recomend either to you. Check Tools Online, Eagle, or any of the other online tool sellers.
Nick B

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repeately stated that it was a waste of my money... Dead on accurate but a royal pain to use.. Besides 90 and 45 degree cuts and an ocassional 22 1/2 I really do not need all that many settings... So I went about making sleds for 90 and 45 degree and use them 100% of the time... The 2000 gathers dust in my shop !
Bob Griffiths
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I have a factory sliding table on my jet supersaw. Its an expensive option. I love it. However, I would definitely hesitate recommending anyone trying to retrofit something like this to a saw. A good sliding table is heavy and needs to get close to blade to really be optimum. Jet is proud of their "only 4 inches from the blade" table. It works extraordinarily well because it weighs so much. I'm still amazed at how well it works when I clamp a piece 6 feet long to it and just slide it through without a waver. However, its a compromise design. The right way to do it is European style - right next to the blade and long table. Now we're talking some big bucks.
If I had it to do over, I'd save the money on the sliding table option and build a really nice cross cut sled. Then I'd save up for my dream $4000 table saw.
Bob

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