SketchUp7 users -"Dynamic" Kitchen Cabinet Face Frame components

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It is the space in the file name that causing the problem, but it needs to be there. Just cut and paste everything from "h" to "p" in zip into your address bar. I'm using fire fox also and it works.
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wrote

I am salivating so baaadly that I have to go see the dentist. Oh, no, that's because my tooth fell out again ...
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Best regards
Han
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It's the space in the filename that is causing the problem, just cut and paste the whole thing into your browser.
I use sketchup primarily just to visualize the big picture. The things I know I'm going to have to fight with it to do what I want, as much from my own lack of experience and not using it often enough to keep fresh with it, I just leave out. That way I can get a quick idea in literally a few minutes, spin the sucker around from different perspectives, throw on some dimensions and I have something I can refer back to in the shop. I don't need to have every detail laid out perfectly to get what I need from it.
This one I did fight with to get the model closer to a finished product, because I was really out in uncharted waters. But I didn't model any of the internal structure. And I did make changes that I didn't bother reflecting in the model because it would have been a PITA, but the point is the model got me to where I could get started on something I was having a hard time visualizing.
http://www.krtwood.com/images/preview/p03.jpg
http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?listing_id 475451
-Kevin
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Gorgeous.
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Thanks Mike!
-Kevin
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To buy it and own it is one thing. To give it away freely with only the hope that you'll use it, that's something else.

http://www.e-woodshop.net/files/Kitchen-wall adjusted12-08.zip
Angle brackets <http....> helps with word wrap and embedded spaces.
1.3 mb was nothing compared to the 33 mb update to sketchup 7. Wouldn't open in 6.
...

Maybe, but I think maybe not. Solidworks and Inventor are not much different for the types of things I would try to use Sketchup. What's important is that the tool doesn't get in the way. None are perfect; they all get in the way, just in different ways and places.
Sketchup had the benefit of letting your customer participate in the design. (Gawd. Talk about dual edge swords.)

Yup. Thanks.
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Perfect. It suits your needs. In the end, that's all that matters. What matters for me, is that, after I do my presentation, and the customer and I work out the bugs, I can go straight to production... with the same files. I already spent the money on the software and became a 3D AutoCAD user 15+ years ago. I also found AutoCAD horribly awkward and non-intuitive. I need the ability to model, such as this:
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/Corner.jpg
and when I make a presentation drawing for a custom big-dollar installation, it also has a complete Bill Of Materials, including slides, knobs and hinges. On a job like this:
http://i123.photobucket.com/albums/o290/Robatoy/217Kit.jpg not having to duplicate over and over when customers make changes is an invaluable tool for me.
Sometimes you need a chisel, sometimes a Multi Router.
btw..eCabinet software is free also. Incredible value, especially when one can detach from the CNC cooperative and accomplish all this in house. http://www.ecabinetsystems.com /
r
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wrote:

Likewise ... the Pro version is in hand. :)

I have to use compatible software because most of the architects I deal with use nothing but.
AutoSketch does that nicely/cheaply for me as I can edit/print .dwg files when necessary, which happens quite a bit.

Believe it or not, SU Pro does the same thing, including keeping track of colors on a wall by wall basis. Using dynamic components you can just let the customer choose/change the hardware, color, etc, from a drop down list, and all from the free version freely available to them. AAMOF, SU is extensible enough using Ruby, that most of the large, high dollar graphic folks have plug-in's readily available for high end rendering, etc.
There are also a world of architects involved in with program now, sort of surprised me, knowing what I know about architects. :)

Hope it's better now ... at one time it was the worst malware I ever loaded on a computer ... it was basically a virus when I belonged to their "network" some five or six years back. Was glad to get it off the office computers.
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Seems to be better. I have only done a few jobs through that community, the fit and finish has been 'adequate'.
The software that turns my crank these days is Vectric's Aspire.

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"Robatoy" wrote

If you really "need" it, ruby scripts, and free software like Kerkythea, are available as plug-ins to Sketchup at much less total cost (often free) than most in situ software.
You mean like these:
http://www.sketchucation.com/forums/scf/viewtopic.php?f &t993 http://www.sketchucation.com/forums/scf/viewtopic.php?f &t103
and before and after:
http://img216.imageshack.us/img216/5012/ariston1jf4.jpg
http://img216.imageshack.us/img216/5959/ariston2hs3.jpg
This discussion has been centered around SketchUp and its application for woodworkers. Most woodworkers would rarely need more than the above ... and it's certainly freely available if they do.
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Swingman wrote:

Good stuff - thank you! My knowledge /is/ cursory, and I /did/ take 'em at their word when they described the "push-pull" tool as being a good way to make holes.
I don't really mind having to create three extra objects I don't want in order to make one that I do, but this is like having a stack of fencepost holes so you can pop 'em into the ground to build a fence...
It all went /really/ weird when I tried to delete the "pipes".
Umm - next up, I'm going to need a threaded hole/cylinder (1/4-20 please) for an Allen setscrew. :)
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"Morris Dovey" wrote\

That's because you do it in woodworking all the time. :)
Besides, the only additional object necessary was the cylinder, which took less that five seconds to draw ... think of it as a jig. :)
What folks, in their initial exposure to the program, can't seem to grasp is that Sketchup is not a CAD program in the traditional sense, and it indeed requires a different mindset to those stuck in the CAD gear. Sadly, and as you see in this thread, it's all to to easy to dismiss the program based on ignorance and misconceptions about "CAD" ... and probably also, because the first things you learn to do when playing around with it do look "cartoonish". :)
There is one guiding principle behind SketchUp's concept that makes it an absolute PERFECT (astounding actually) fit with woodworking endeavors:
~ Sketchup deals with the manipulation of "surfaces" and "edges". ~ Woodworking deals with the manipulation of "surfaces" and "edges"*
A woodworker couldn't ask for more ...
Once this is grasped by an open mind, the program morphs into an astounding tool for the woodworker interested in designing his own projects, from simple tables, to complex joinery, constructing them, and, for the professional woodworker, presenting them to clients ... all with a lot less effort, and less lost shop time, than with most similar programs.
Simply speaking, build a SketchUp model precisely like you would a woodworking project, by starting with the individual components, then join the individual parts into the whole. Once you're done, you have both a model (plan), for your own use or for presentation, and, most importantly, you have solved most of the construction problems and gained an intimate knowledge of what you need to do to build the model when you hit the shop.
The price is right, the program is much more intuitive than most CAD software, doesn't require all that much time to become reasonably proficient, and at that point the payback becomes way out of proportion to the effort expended.
AAMOF, there are few tools more advantageous to a smart, serious woodworker! It appears that more and more of same are beginning to realize that. :)
Great time to be alive ... this digital age!
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Swingman wrote:

Tried that (several times) and took screen shots at each stage. Pix on abpw.

Obviously I'm doing something horribly wrong, but it isn't a three minute job yet...
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Morris Dovey
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"Morris Dovey" wrote

Draw your cylinder; make it into a "component"; poke it through your curved surface; "interface with model"; "explode" the cylinder; erase the parts of the cylinder you don't want (three parts, plus the ends);, lastly, erase the remnants (a circle on either side) of the cylinder on the face of the curved surface.
It takes less time to do than tell ... if you're really interested, and I can find the time today, I'll make you an animated "tutorial" of the steps above ... using the "scenes" function, a tutorial is easy to do in SketchUp.
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I'm looking forward to that. I have tried a couple of times to use Sketchup, but I'm too atherosclerosed to understand what I am supposed to do.
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Best regards
Han
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Han wrote:

I can relate to that. I'm on my 3rd, or possibly 4th attempt to learn SU and I think I got it this time. Problem is, it does so much stuff and does it very easily, that you get twisted up in it's capabilities. You can't learn it all in a week it seems. You need to put in some time and work at it a bit, with good tutorials at hand. Just getting the axis to work took me a while. One problem I think people have is thinking it is limited because it's free. I have have enough under my belt now to know this sucker is nothing less than amazing in it's capabilities.
I know it enough now to say it is the best thing for woodworkers to come along in a long time, especially the hobbyist or small shop owner that doesn't have the time or money to spend on autocad (I don't know zip about autocad other than all the architects seem to use it and it costs a fortune and the learning curve is supposedly steep.)
For me, I learned how to draw with a pencil well enough to "sketch up" anything I wanted to make, quickly. After all, once you learn how to build stuff, you don't need anything real fancy, sometimes just a few sizes jotted down to get things right. This program makes that about obsolete as I can do pretty fancy drawings to perfect scale, with close enough colors if I want to see not just how to build something, but exactly what it will look like when I'm done. The time it takes to do this is warp speed once you learn how to use it.
I'm still amazed something this good is free. I keep waiting for the "hook" to dig into my lip, but seems their is such a thing as a free lunch...
I been thinking of making another work bench for my shop for a long time and decided to use this idea to learn SU. I could have built this thing several times already for the hours I put in SU, but 99% of the time was learning. Now I could do this whole thing from scrath in less than an hour, and I'm still VERY new at this. Here is a picture of the bench,
http://jbstein.com/Flick/Bench1.jpg
the SU file is not finished, I'll probably start over just to make sure things are really how I want them, but here it is, I enjoy looking at others stuff, so I might as well put it up...
http://jbstein.com/Flick/Bench1.skp
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"Jack Stein" wrote\

Well said, Jack!

LOL .. myself!
I do have the Pro version because I'm building a custom home where much of the design was done using the free version and the designer could not print out construction documents that were suitable for bidding/building ... and if I had to buy it, I wasn't going to buy it for anyone else! :)
The Pro version makes it possible for me to take the designer's models and output industry standard construction documents, and since I have it, I figured I'd whip up some dynamic cabinet components and put them up for free download for those using the free version. Besides, it was a valuable learning experience for me, and one that upped my facility with program.

Well done ... good to hear from those who've snapped to the value this program can bring to woodworkers in particular.
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Swingman wrote:

Yes, I think it's kind of neat that everything seems to be included in the free version except stuff that would be used by a professional to share files with other programs. I'm still not too clear on whether the professional version has capabilities a hobbyist would need?

I'm not too clear on what dynamic components are? I haven't figured out yet how to resize things to scale yet, but I watched a video on Fine Woodworking (thanks for that link) and it seemed easy enough by just selecting and moving part of the design. I haven't tried it yet, but on your base cabinet, which I grabbed, I attempted to select part of it but it didn't select as shown in the video... I spent 30 seconds on it though, will try again with the tutorial in hand. I'm hoping that is not something only in the pro version..
Besides, it was a valuable

You seem to have picked it up rather quickly. Either you are really really smart, or you put more time in it than comes across in your posts. Anyway, you are largely responsible for me not hastily tossing it aside, and I'll bet a number of others will hang in there thanks to your discussions on the subject. Keep up the good work.

Again, you deserve lots of credit for keeping this in focus, at least for me. One of the problems I have is all the tutorials I used to learn on were buildings and stuff, instead of drawers, benches, cabinets and what not.
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"Jack Stein" wrote

On the scaling issue: On normal models you will see scaling handles on all three of the x,y,z axis. On a dynamic component the creator can constrain the model to respond only to the axis he wants you to see, and he can hide the rest.
Since a base cabinet is almost always 34 1/2" high (z axis), and 24" deep (y axis), there is no need to use the scaling handles for these two axis'.
On these particular models, you may have to "orbit" the model slightly to that you can clearly see one of the side panels in order to see the x axis (width) scaling handle ... there should be on either side. On the wall cabinet you should see two scaling handles, one for height (z) and one for width (x).

Other than the ability to create "dynamic components", there is no functional difference between the Free and the Pro versions. Both versions can _use_ dynamic components, but they can only be _created_ in the Pro version.
The Pro version also has many more importing, exporting, and printing options, in addition to a presentation program/function called "Layout" that acts like programs similar to PageMaker, which allows you to create presentation documents, plans, etc from models.
IOW, there is nothing I can draw with the Pro version that you can't draw with the Free.

There is apparently a bug in SU7 on some systems that, when downloading and then opening a dynamic component, you may have to "explode" the component _one_ time to get it to work.
However, try this before doing that: Single click the model to select it; then on the toolbar go to Window/Component Options and click.
This should bring up the "Component Options" window, and, if a list box should appear with dimensions on it, you're fine and don't need to do anything else, except to select whatever dimension you want, click Apply, and the model will resize to your chosen dimension.
If you see the sentence "There are no options to choose on this component", then context/right click on the model and chose "explode", then go back and try the above again. That should fix it.

It's not ... dynamic components can be _used_ by the free version of SketchUP7 with no problem.
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Swingman wrote:

OK, I spent a bit more time on the Tutorial on FW and managed to get it to work. Here is the link:
http://finewoodworking.taunton.com/item/2538/modifying-a-dovetailed-drawer
I first did it to something I made, and then to your base cabinet. I exploded the thing first but not sure yet exactly what "explode" does, or if I had to do it first or not. This worked pretty good, and I was impressed that after resizing the drawer I was working on, the dimensions I had made also changed to show the correct size.

I got the list box, but no dimensions.

I'm probably doing something wrong. Sometimes little subtilities bite you in the ass on this thing.
The scale tool I have all sorts of trouble with. I haven't spent much time with it though. I kind of like the FW tutorial I listed above. Once I figured out the correct steps to use, it worked well. I can make your basic case any size I want and I'm sure once I figure out how to get the scale tool to work, It'll be even easier. This thing is awesome in it's power.
Those of you that tried several times, hang in there, it is worth the effort. It is NOT something most can learn in a few days. It does SO much stuff it can be overwhelming, particularly when you try to force feed the learning process. Thats what I do and frankly, I'm not smart enough to conceptualize all this stuff in an instant, it takes time, and for me, I get frustrated and quit for a while. So, while it is VERY easy to use, learning how it all works is a bit of a curve because it does so much.
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