size &/or "Wonder" wheel, grinding disk, or blade on TS for safe cutting of acrylic light shield plastic

again
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is my TS. It has an 15A, 3hp, 10", 5000rpm, standard 5/8" round arbor, and came e with a 1/8" 36-tooth carbide tipped combination blade. I also have a 10" 200-tooth alternating kerf blade I bought for plywood. I am not sure if this m/c has anything in common wit soft-start technology.
I need to cut a new piece of that thin plastic sheet for a fluorescent light housing I am making, as well as replace another cover have. I have to cut them through 4' lengths. it is very thin, like 1/16"ish.
I am curious if I will ever get the need to buy any type of special wheel/disk/blade that will fit in my TS that is designed for cutting plastics and other non-wood materials.
I have just been to Canadian Tire and Home Depot. HD has something called a "Wonder" disk/wheel, which abrades in chips as opposed to cuts like a blade. Well that is the theory of grinding when it comes to metal, significantly.
Could I cut this thin prismatic pattern acrylic plastic sheet (sign says acrylic doesn't yellow as opposed to styrene) with either of the wood blades I already have? The plywood blade actually has the two words "WOOD" and "PLASTIC" printed on it.
However, barring that, and assuming I now need to buy an "abrading disk/wheel' I come to my questions:
The "Wonder" disk at HD is 8" I think, maybe 7". I didn't look at it closely, but maybe it is a little different that a regular grinding wheel of the (concrete/metal/cut-off) variety, and may have applications above and beyond, regardless of its (not max of 10") size, which would allow for future uses. I think it may have a more open structure. There are a lot of regular grinding disks that come in lager sizes, including 10", in metal and concrete cut-off type. They may be intended for other tools, and can/do say on the package "for use with tools having metal guards" (like circ saws, and grinders). In fact I am not even sure about the wonder wheel use on a TS. So is it safe? I would say my options are either 8" (or 7") "Wonder" wheel, or up to, & definitely including 10" 3/32" or 1/8" metal-type cut-off grinding wheel. Could get the concrete, but probably thicker and therefor n.a. All of the wheels have a safe max. rpm, I just checked them all. Not sure about the guard/soft-start stuff though.
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again
http://canadiantire.ca/browse/product_detail.jsp ;jsessionid=FsJ2VRLqoqk6zV52th4JCHhJAM74b1KeC568GVrxLv5wBZQrmLU9!1025536914!172915483!7205!7305?postal=m4g+2r9&PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id„5524443277381&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id08474396672971&bmForm=form_set_price_list&bmFormID64757430880&bmUID64757430880&bmHashu212f682c95d534a61db92475f0c1b773a15348
is my TS. It has an 15A, 3hp, 10", 5000rpm, standard 5/8" round arbor, and came e with a 1/8" 36-tooth carbide tipped combination blade. I also have a 10" 200-tooth alternating kerf blade I bought for plywood. I am not sure if this m/c has anything in common wit soft-start technology.
I need to cut a new piece of that thin plastic sheet for a fluorescent light housing I am making, as well as replace another cover have. I have to cut them through 4' lengths. it is very thin, like 1/16"ish.
I am curious if I will ever get the need to buy any type of special wheel/disk/blade that will fit in my TS that is designed for cutting plastics and other non-wood materials.
I have just been to Canadian Tire and Home Depot. HD has something called a "Wonder" disk/wheel, which abrades in chips as opposed to cuts like a blade. Well that is the theory of grinding when it comes to metal, significantly.
Could I cut this thin prismatic pattern acrylic plastic sheet (sign says acrylic doesn't yellow as opposed to styrene) with either of the wood blades I already have? The plywood blade actually has the two words "WOOD" and "PLASTIC" printed on it.
However, barring that, and assuming I now need to buy an "abrading disk/wheel' I come to my questions:
The "Wonder" disk at HD is 8" I think, maybe 7". I didn't look at it closely, but maybe it is a little different that a regular grinding wheel of the (concrete/metal/cut-off) variety, and may have applications above and beyond, regardless of its (not max of 10") size, which would allow for future uses. I think it may have a more open structure. There are a lot of regular grinding disks that come in lager sizes, including 10", in metal and concrete cut-off type. They may be intended for other tools, and can/do say on the package "for use with tools having metal guards" (like circ saws, and grinders). In fact I am not even sure about the wonder wheel use on a TS. So is it safe? I would say my options are either 8" (or 7") "Wonder" wheel, or up to, & definitely including 10" 3/32" or 1/8" metal-type cut-off grinding wheel. Could get the concrete, but probably thicker and therefor n.a. All of the wheels have a safe max. rpm, I just checked them all. Not sure about the guard/soft-start stuff though.
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bent wrote:

I'd use a utility knife and a straight edge.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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bent wrote:

http://canadiantire.ca/browse/product_detail.jsp ;jsessionid=FsJ2VRLqoqk6zV52th4JCHhJAM74b1KeC568GVrxLv5wBZQrmLU9!1025536914!172915483!7205!7305?postal=m4g+2r9&PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id„5524443277381&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id08474396672971&bmForm=form_set_price_list&bmFormID64757430880&bmUID64757430880&bmHashu212f682c95d534a61db92475f0c1b773a15348
You don't need any special blade for this type of cutting. I've cut this type of material with a regular blade, a cross cut or plywood blade work best. All you do is put the blade on backwards, teeth rotating away instead of toward the feed. If you try this with wood, it won't cut and will likely throw the wood, but with thin plastic it will cut/melt very smoothly, but make sure you don't feed too fast and hold it down tightly. You may end up with a bit of curl at the edge of the cut but the curl (melted part) will breaks off easily or you can take a swipe at it with coarse sand paper. One swipe is about all you need. Try it.
Don't know where I heard this but tried it and it worked like a charm on those skinny plastic covers from Lowe's.
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Why not just use a sheetrock knife? A tablesaw is overkill for this project.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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well if anybodys still coming in here to look, are these types of wheels safe, and how about the sizes, I would think if it is safe, the bigger the better, and I have no idea of a miinimum. A 10" 3/32" metal cut-off 6000 (or 7200) rpm, 5/8" arbor is $6. Same with 1/8". Isn't this usefull. What about abs and pvc, say pipe?
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bent wrote:

I would not use an abrasive type wheel on a table saw. These blades are designed to come apart as they're used. When used on an angle grinder or circ. saw, they have a metal guard covering most of the blade, so that if/when the blade breaks up, the pieces are contained (somewhat). Imagine that abrasive blade breaking up while spinning in a table saw - those pieces that go flying would be a pretty serious hazard. Now, with a zero clearance insert and a blade guard in place, you could minimize the risk, but why bother. As others have said, for what you are trying to cut, the best bet is to use a straight edge and a razor knife.
Mike
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bent wrote:

http://canadiantire.ca/browse/product_detail.jsp ;jsessionid=FsJ2VRLqoqk6zV52th4JCHhJAM74b1KeC568GVrxLv5wBZQrmLU9!1025536914!172915483!7205!7305?postal=m4g+2r9&PRODUCT%3C%3Eprd_id„5524443277381&FOLDER%3C%3Efolder_id08474396672971&bmForm=form_set_price_list&bmFormID64757430880&bmUID64757430880&bmHashu212f682c95d534a61db92475f0c1b773a15348
melting and sticking to the blade. I doubt that any kinda table saw blade will give a clean cut on plastic. Was it me, I'd clamp a good straight edge to the plastic and score it deeply with a utility knife. Then break it along the score line. I made an enclosure for a kitchen fluorescent ceiling lamp many years ago, and used a utility knife to cut the plastic.
David Starr
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well ther goes another dream
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I use my table saw to cut plastic sheet by setting the blade to cut only part of the way through. Like a score only faster, especially for pieces longer than my straight edge. The only downside is the plastic dust gets a static charge and sticks to everything.
x
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