Silicon spray on Table saw blade

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Has anyone tried silicon spray on a table saw blade, to reduce power requirement?
Walter H. Klaus
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It's not a good idea to have silicone around wood work, it will make problems with your finish. Johnson's wax will help. I put it on my band saw blade and it quiets it down. Johnson's wax has no silicone in it.
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Silicone will get onto the wood and finishes won't take
A properly aligned saw with carbide blade will not be helped with lubricant. The tips are wider than the blade so there should be no contact aside from the tooth. Still blades may rub but they are not the best blade to use anyway.
Upgrade to a better saw and you'll be much happier.
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Walter H. Klaus wrote:

Silicone and woodworking do not mix. Don't get silicone anywhere near anything used to work with wood. Plays Hell with both finishing and adhesive bonding, and the stuff is almost impossible to remove once applied.
I've had good results from sawing through a piece of UHMW polyethylene (wasn't looking for improved cutting, my objective was to cut the polyethylene).
There are purpose-made lubricants. (Amazon.com product link shortened) is one example, http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?Offerings_ID 325&TabSelecttails is another.
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Silicon will NOT go away. It may become too spread out to matter, but will not leave.
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"Walter H. Klaus" wrote

Since you were unaware of the dangers of silicone in a woodshop, you may also be unaware of a product called "TopCote":
http://www.bostik-us.com/products/index.asp?fa tegories&divisionId=6&categoryId'
If really you feel the need to lubricate your table saw blade, TopCote will do the job without danger to any future film finishes applied to your projects.
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Swingman wrote:

TopCote's sister, DriCote, is designed specifically for cutting edges.
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I could well be wrong, but I've suspected that the difference may actually be more "marketing", than performance, in practical usage. IOW, the old "change the proportions slightly/add solvent/target a different market" ploy?
In any event, my use of both, admittedly in non-scientific, everyday, practical usage, as well as their respective MSDS sheets, has reinforced my decision to buy only one product, with basically identical results. :)
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Have any of U used a product called SlipIt? It comes in a quart sized paint can. I use it and haven't had any problems with it. It makes my saws cast iron table top slick and wood moves easily with no resistance.
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Joe wrote:

I LIKE Waxilit, but haven't tried SlipIt. Where do you get it?
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Woodcraft has it. I think it's 13.95 a quart.
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From the response I think you get the point. NO No no NO NOOOO!
Stu

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wrote:

Wow. A can of Johnson's Paste Wax is about 6.95, and is good for years.
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Yeah but Johnson's paste wax is about the least effective product that I have used for rust prevention and or slicking up the surface.
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It works great for me -- but if I recall correctly, you live in the Houston area, which is a *lot* more humid than where I live (Indianapolis). I'm sure that makes a difference. Another thing that might be a factor is the location of the shop. I don't recall if you've ever mentioned where yours is; mine is in the basement of my house, so it's climate-controlled year-round. I run dehumidifiers constantly, too.
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Yes Johnson's wax does work well for many. Others in other locations require a better solution. Yeah I'm in Houston, with its humidity. My shop in my garage facing North. Facing north does make a difference. Living somewhat near the coast the prevailing southerly winds bring in moist air from the gulf. Typically southern exposed surfaces will rust more quickly than the northern facing surfaces. I suspect that there is a trace of salt mixed in with that southern breeze.
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Wow, I forgot about the salt. I've lived in the Great Lakes region my entire life, and we tend not to think about sort of thing here. Folks from other parts of the world do: I remember reading a few years ago about a German tourist visiting the beach in Milwaukee who fell asleep on an air mattress and drifted out into the lake. The Coast Guard rescued him the next morning, suffering from sunburn (of course) and dehydration. What?? Dehydration? In Lake Michigan? Then it dawned on me. Tourist. German. The guy is definitely Not From Around Here. Probably never even crossed his mind that the water might be *fresh*. Might not have crossed yours, either, if you've lived in Houston all your life, but if you grow up around the Great Lakes as I did, salt water is the novelty. :-)
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Leon wrote:

Same here.
I really like Waxilit after using Top Cote and clones, Top Saver, paste wax, canning wax, etc...
I initially bought Waxilit as a glue resist, but tried it on the iron based on the suggestion on the can.
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IIRC when I was researching Waxilit its was developed for the purpose of protecting and slicking up the exposed surfaces of machinery.
I started using these specially formulated protestants in the late 80's. TopCote was owned by the people that make Empire products and the product came in pump bottles.. Apparently they sold the product to Bostitch and it was has since been packaged in a pressurized aerosol. Empire Top Saver, Top Lube, etc made by the original makers of TopCote is pretty good stuff also. Their products come in the familiar pump bottles.
Anyway after about 6 years of using TopCote I decided to use the Empire Top Saver product on my TS top. I squirted the product all over the top and then laid a Scotch Brite pad on the surface, set my ROS on top of the pad and proceeded to work the surface over. Wow, the surface was nice and clean looking again. Since that treatment the top has been even more resistant to rust although I still use TopCote regularly.
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B A R R Y wrote:

From Mr. SlipIt (Matt Ritter) of course:
Matt Ritter SLIPIT Industries, Inc. 800-303-0034 http://www.slipit.com/home.html
Anybody know what happened to the Google archives for rec.woodworking? An advanced Google search for the "never ending" SlipIt thread of about 10 years ago only turns up two messages for the entire thread.
http://groups.google.com/group/rec.woodworking/browse_thread/thread/9500b19246aba2ce/b84c4148fffb7b93?lnk=st&q=#b84c4148fffb7b93
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Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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