Should I do 9' or 10' walls in a shop?

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Brian Elfert wrote:

I finished my shop a few years ago, with 9' ceilings (actually, closer to 8' 10"), and I regret it. Stick the 10' measurement in, slop an extra 4" of ceiling insulation in to reduce heating costs, and go.
The ONLY problem 10' ceilings create is changing light bulbs: you need a ladder instead of a chair.
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You won't spend that much more to go 10'. 2x4's are relatively inexpensive and so is drywall. Your foundation and roof won't change at all. I know it's more insulation and wiring etc. but how many times are you going to get to build a shop from scratch. Pick up a full piece of 4x8 plywood to move around and see how high off the ground you lift it then figure how high the top of the piece went. With lights and storage overhead you'll end up thinking about 12' ceilings. I think drywall can be special ordered in 5' wide pieces (difficult for one guy to handle) but if you use regular 4x8 sheets you'll split one to finish you your walls or if you go to 12' you won't have to cut them at all. Whatever you do I'll be jealous. I've got a 2 car garage that I try to park one car regularly and everything is on wheels. I am happy to have it but it would be nice to have permanent spots to park the equipment on. Robert
Brian Elfert wrote:

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I doubt anyone would recommend 9 over 10. Build it as high as you can afford. You won't regret it. Dave
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Brian,

When we built our garage, I made a 2' high concrete perimeter foundation. Then I built standard 8' high walls on top of that. Once the slab was poured and the ceiling sheetrocked, I ended up with just over 9-1/2 feet of ceiling height.
This has worked out to a very comfortable height for me. I can stand plywood sheets on end, and carry them around easily. I can rotate the plywood sheet end for end and not hit the ceiling. I can stand 8' boards upright against the wall (I have to set 10' boards at an angle, or lay them flat). And, I can easily maneuver 7 foot high cabinets (pantry, armoires, etc.).
I used low profile T8 Fluorescent lights on the ceiling, electronic ballast, instant on, no flicker, good in cold weather. They only stick down about 4 inches from the ceiling.
I used garage door tracks that sit a little closer to the ceiling, but they still stick down about 1-1/2 feet from the ceiling. I've banged them with a board once or twice, but since they only stick out 9' into my 28' garage, they're not usually a problem.
I used 2x6 studs with R19 insulation, and a 4000 watt Cadet "Hot One" electric heater will just keep it warm in there when I need heat. It's a little undersized for the space (I should have about 6500 watts for my 650 sq/ft), but I don't need the heat very often, and 67-68 degrees feels really warm when I'm busy working.
Anthony
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Ok, I've got ceiling envy now... *g*
If it's affordable, I'd go 10'..... If you work with sheet goods, picture flipping over a sheet of plywood and catching a corner on a light fixture...
My work area is divided in 2 areas, one with 7' ceiling and the other with 9' or so at the peak.. I find myself stepping outside the garage door to handle 8' tow-bys and sheet goods...
mac
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I have 10' ceilings in my garage.... errr, shop. I love it. I know I'd be whacking the ceiling a ton if they were 9'. As well, if I were building a dedicated shop I would do the framed floor as someone else here suggested. Run all your DC and wiring below the floor. There are so many advantages to this:
1. Unbelievably easier on your joints and back. My floor is concrete and it's a killer. I have 25 of those 3'x3' rubber mats and my back still gets very sore. 2. Your shop will be much cleaner looking and you won't have pipes to bang material into. I know about this! 3. Your DC system will work much better. The piping won't have to run from the floor to the ceiling and back down again. This is a big deal in the DC world.
If you're set on a concrete floor with no subfloor then plumb your DC and wiring right into the concrete. I've seen this done and it's fantastic. You just don't get the benefit of the wood floor being easier on your body. The only catch is you need to plan your shop and tool placements very well. It will be a lot tougher to move your TS to the other side of the shop afterwards.
Neil
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Brian Elfert wrote:

Have you consider ICF instead of stick built? I went that route, and 16' sidewalls. W/ a 16 sidewall you can put in a lofted area and add a lot to your useable square footage.
Just a consideration. Given your suggested budget, this is a possibility. I built mine in the neighborhood of your budget. But this will vary based on location and other variables.
JW
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jw wrote:

Check out the new issue of Fine Homebuilding for some good information on energy efficient stickframing.
JP ***************** Stuck.
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I plan to use basically everything from the Fine Homebuilding article except the foamboard sheathimg. Plywood only costs $5 a sheet more and eliminates the issues of shear strength and hanging siding.
Brian Elfert
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Brian,
I have 9 1/2 ft ceilings in basement / wood shop. This height is plenty high enough for me. I also have radiant floor heat which is absolutely wonderful! The only thing I would have done different if I could do it over again would be to my a floor plan for my shop and put the dust collection pipes in the floor.
Bryan
Brian Elfert wrote:

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With pipes in the floor, how do you handle things like planers that collect from the top? Elbows?
Brian Elfert
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wrote:

Exactly.
A straight pipe from the floor goes into a gentle arc, and short section of flex pipe.
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