Shop with an exterior platform. What type of flooring would hold up?

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I have my shop in a not-big-enough shed.
Several of my machines are on hard rubber dolly wheels.
I'm thinking of building a 8' x 10'platform/deck outside the front door. I want it so that I'd have a place to roll out a couple of machines when I needed more elbow room, or to roll the table saw onto when I have to cut sheet goods. I think I can do it with 2 x 6 joists held off the ground by masonry blocks. If I put a typical surface on, I'll run into the hassle of rolling the machines over grooves.
If I did use 2 x 6 decking I'm thinking that I'd like to rip flat edges on them so that they would butt to create a flat floor. Would eliminating the spacing lead to weathering problems? I actually don't like this idea but I can't think of any other way to get a flat floor. (I once used Northern Yellow Cedar for decking, but
I also don't know how such decking surface would hold up to being assaulted by the wheels. Can anyone recommend an alternate type flooring that will stand up to outdoor NJ exposure. I probably won't build it until next spring.
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On 9/27/10 10:52 PM, KIMOSABE wrote:

I wouldn't butt deck boards together. Just brainstorming with the following, how about an overlay on a standard deck:
Hardboard - probably have to be replaced every couple years, but cheap. Hardiboard - makes good siding, not sure about for a floor product. Metal - probably too hot in the summer.
Just ideas to start a discussion.
--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
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Ipe though it's pricey. It should butt nicely and requires almost zero care.
Dave in Houston
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How high is your shed's floor off the ground?
Sonny
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The shed sits on masonry blocks which are in turn sitting on an 8" bed of crushed stone. This was required by the bldg. code.
The actual floor of the shed is 9 inches above ground level. The land here is VERY sandy soil (NJ shore area). The land rises a few inches as it gets farther from the front.
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On 9/28/10 12:35 PM, KIMOSABE wrote:

Oh geez, New Jersey. You probably can't pee in your back yard with installing a leach bed and getting a permit from the EPA. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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My initial thinking was concrete slab, so I had asked to get some idea of how much fill may be required, for a slab to be even with your shed floor. Shouldn't be very difficult or expensive to lay another foundation and, I suppose, you would have to do so, anyway, whether you elected to pour a slab or frame a deck, since your state seems to require it, no matter what.
Whichever you elect, might as well build/pour as big of one as you can afford, manage, have space for, etc., so you won't have to address the issue later, i.e., go through any code issue again, if that's a hassle.
Another consideration (for the future, maybe?): What might be the propect of using a newly poured slab to become the floor of a new shed, later. Would this relocation, of a later shop (I like shop, better), be coordinated with your surroundings/lawn?
Sonny
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On 9/28/10 6:55 PM, Sonny wrote:

I neglected to mention it in my post, but that's one reason I suggested a floating slab foundation. He would be ready to go, when and if he decided to expand the shop.. er, shed.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Concrete pad. Use concrete block or landscaping bricks for a skirt to bring it up to the grade of the shed and packed fill dirt and crusher-run gravel dust.
If the shed is on grade with the surrounding ground, pour a floating slab foundation. Google it. The "footing" portion doesn't have to be as deep and wide as it would to hold a structure above... just deep enough to keep the pad from creeping due to freeze and thaw.
If you go the lumber route, pressure treated plywood for the deck.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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"KIMOSABE" wrote:

------------------------------------ Advance to "GO" and collect $200, then go straight to a concrete slab.
BTDT, forget the T-Shirt.
Wood will rot.
A concrete slab can be used for winter storage when you include a tarp.
BTDT
Lew
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Investigate steel. Columns with floor joists, then B decking with about two to three inches of concrete. Spendy, but not that hard to do, and maintains easier than wood in that climate.
Steve
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Exterior grade 1" ply over framing with some cheap replacable linoleum (spelling?) rolled out over it.
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I vote concrete slab. Compare costs for a framed deck vs concrete. Concrete may be cheaper and no maintenance. No footing is required.
Compare costs for a 10'X12' or 12'X14' slab, too. You may want to enlarge your shed or replace it, in the future. *12'X14' may need an expansion joint.
Sonny
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Sorry for being late to the party.
The ply with linoleum is not a bad way to go, but you would need to glue it down to the ply with mastic. Otherwise, it would roll forward from rolling a heavy machine, like a wave. BTDT. I would use a layer of 1/2" then a layer of 3/4" with the seams not falling in the same place.
Easier to just lay another layer of ply and sheet goods over the first, layer, when the sheet goods needs to be replaced. The good thing about using sheet goods is the fact that it will keep the ply somewhat dry, to make it last longer. I would use treated ply, instead of exterior ply. The ext will not hold up for more than a couple years.
The best way is the concrete, but forget the steel for the base. WAY more expensive, compared to gravel or dirt fill.
I had a friend that put a new deck on his pontoon boat. He used treated plywood, and then covered it with a layer of fiberglass cloth and epoxy. Very durable, and the fiberglass kept the wood dry.
You would not be happy with using planks like a regular deck. It would have to use pneumatic wheels to roll around machines. Still, dropped screws and nails and parts of machines being taken apart will always disappear down the cracks. Murphy's Law, I think!
Jim in NC
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KIMOSABE wrote:

I vote for concrete too. Around here (central Florida) you could hire it done for about $2.75/sq.ft.
--

dadiOH
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says...

If concrete's not an option I'd be tempted to try a couple of layers of 3/4 Extira over whatever support structure is appropriate, then shoot truck-bed liner on it.
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How about exterior (non-porous) tile for the surface? The underlying structure would have to be pretty stiff to take the machinery but should be do-able. Grout lines may be an issue but this could be minimized with an 18x18.
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KIMOSABE wrote:

As others have stated I'd opt for the concrete deck. I'd also compare the cost of the the deck to the cost of expanding the shed.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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KIMOSABE wrote the following:

I vote concrete like some of the other responders. Just think about rolling the machines out there after a rain. Do you want to be using dangerous tools with a wet wood/tile deck?
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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What's the difference between tile and concrete? If you're worried about electricity and water mixing, tile should be better. If it's slipping that's the problem, the tile can be selected for its slip resistance. A litttle slope should clear it of water pretty quickly.
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