shop heat....dedux? lol

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skeezics (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| thats interesting. what might a solar system cost? got some links?
You gotta be kidding!
But just in case you're not:
You can build enough passive solar heating panels to heat a shop the size of a two-car garage for less than $500 in materials and a not-unreasonable amount of work. You'll need a table saw, router, some clamps, and a screwdriver.
For links try http://www.google.com and lurk on news:alt.solar.thermal - and if you get really stumped, try following the link below and browse for ideas.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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wrote:

nope not kidding! i didnt realize it could be so cheaply done. even if it were over 1000 bucks it would pay for itself over time and eventually be free heat. free is my favorite number. lol btw... thanks for the idea and the links. ive heard of solor but never thought about it for this . doeh!!!!.
skeez
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skeezics (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| nope not kidding! i didnt realize it could be so cheaply done. even | if it were over 1000 bucks it would pay for itself over time and | eventually be free heat. free is my favorite number. lol btw... | thanks for the idea and the links. ive heard of solor but never | thought about it for this . doeh!!!!.
For people with reasonable woodworking skills, solar panels are *not* a difficult undertaking. To get you started in the right direction, there are a few simple principles to keep in mind:
[1] Warm (less dense) air always rises above cooler (more dense) air.
[2] The glazed area of a panel determines the amount of energy available for capture.
[3] The goal is to get heat *out* of the panel and into the heated space, *not* to maximize the temperature inside the panel. Remember that heat and temperature are *not* synonyms.
[4] The panel joinery and glazing needs to be as close to airtight as you can manage.
[5] For a given panel design, taller panels will generate higher temperatures - and it /is/ possible to build a panel capable of catastrophic self-destruction (so don't get _too_ greedy!)
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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wrote:

great info. i think i can do this. certainly warming the shop wil not be instantainious. how long does it take to get heat after a cold night? i know this is a very general question but im unsure how to pose it. i am thinking i should have a heater for the morning hours till the sun gets up and the air has a chance to get moving. i usualy get out ther at or before daylight so a warm up would be required. but the solar sound good because i wont have to run the heater all day. weekdays would be beter cause it would be afternoon before i could get into the shop. after reading just a little bit i an concidering a panel about 4 feet wide and 6 to 8 feet high and using 8" flex for the in and out pipeing. i have a couple of 6" computer mainframe fans that would assist in air flow. does this sound feasible?
skeez
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skeezics (in snipped-for-privacy@4ax.com) said:
| On Thu, 17 Nov 2005 09:02:03 -0600, "Morris Dovey"
<snip>
|| [1] Warm (less dense) air always rises above cooler (more dense) || air. || || [2] The glazed area of a panel determines the amount of energy || available for capture. || || [3] The goal is to get heat *out* of the panel and into the heated || space, *not* to maximize the temperature inside the panel. Remember || that heat and temperature are *not* synonyms. || || [4] The panel joinery and glazing needs to be as close to airtight || as you can manage. || || [5] For a given panel design, taller panels will generate higher || temperatures - and it /is/ possible to build a panel capable of || catastrophic self-destruction (so don't get _too_ greedy!)
<snip>
| after reading just a | little bit i an concidering a panel about 4 feet wide and 6 to 8 | feet high and using 8" flex for the in and out pipeing. i have a | couple of 6" computer mainframe fans that would assist in air flow. | does this sound feasible?
Depends. Any kind of ducting will impede airflow - so it'd be appropriate to ask if you really need ducting. If you use ducting you don't really need and incorporate a fan to make up for having used it, you're wasting power. How will this setup behave when the fan is switched off or when the power fails?
I'd try for a design that uses principal [1] to obviate ducting and/or fan. If you want a fan, put it near the ceiling and use it to blow warm air toward the floor, so that the heat (from whatever source) is better distributed. If you want to use ducting, use it with the fan to draw the warm air from near the ceiling and blow it across the floor (a concrete floor can work passably well as a thermal "flywheel" to temper night temperature drops).
If you want to get fancy, control the ceiling fan with an air conditioning thermostat near the ceiling.
I'd want the bottom of the panel above the level where termites and carpenter ants might be inclined to make a meal of it. The top of the panel discharge shouldn't be higher than your ceiling. Work backward from there to determine the best panel height.
HTH
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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Tue, Nov 15, 2005, 11:52pm (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@home.com (skeezics) doth burble: <snip> gas heat is just 1 more thing to run to town for in the middle of important shop time. <snip>
Maybe for you. Me, I'd have at least one spare tank. Or, a couple of the big tanks, then when one ran out, call the gas guy to come out and fill it.
JOAT Just pretend I'm not here. That's what I'm doing.
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On Thu, 17 Nov 2005 18:32:52 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

yeh i know all about the big tank fillup theory. i heat the house with propane. the price has gone through the roof lately. thats why im concidering solor heat for the shop. looks workable. if it works well in the uninsulated shop there just may be another system for tghe house in the near future. use the gas mans money for more wood and tools! lol... im shocked that you aint doing this JOAT. BTW any of those boat motors runnig yet? no???? well dont feel bad those rusty old handsaws are still hangin round rusty. someday........
skeez
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