Shop-built panel saw

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Lou,
If I understand you correctly, you used a piece of oak 1/2"x2-1/2"x96" for the guide. How did you mount ot on the base ply to assure it would be straight? Did you use the plywood factory edge as a guide or some other means?
Thanks,
Bill
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Hi again Bill,
My 1/4 oak ply base started at about 10 x 96. The oak strip that I ripped from a 1x3 x96 was about 1/2 x 3/4 x 96 after I ripped it. I took that strip and, with the factory edge toward the blade side, measured in about 2 inches. I used a square to get it consistent up & down the 96 inch length before I glued/tacked/screwed. My saw's offset is about 1 3/8 inches which is why I measured in 2 inches.
To be honest, I initially intended to use these sawboards to simply give me panels that were reasonable size that I could finish on the TS. I was pleasantly surprised to find that the cuts were very accurate & square.
Lou

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Lou,
Thanks for the follow-up reply. I guess the bottom line here is that you used the factory edge of your base material to index the oak guide strip and the results you get from that are most satisfactory. Sounds reasonable to me. Building a couple of these sounds like a good idea.
Thanks again,
Bill
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Good luck Bill...I thimk you will like the result - you seem like the type of person who want's to know all details first. I resemble that.
I predict that you will be very pleased with your sawboard(s).
Lou

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On Wed, 4 May 2005 11:54:22 -0400, "Bill Leonhardt"
I am not sure you understand. You make the oak (which has to be straight; you couod use aluminium here) as near as possible to right. But that's only really for appearnce. The trick is that you let it set, then cut the ply using the oak as a fence. This ensures that you have a ply edge that is dead parallel to the oak, as straight as the oak, and exactly the right distance away so that you will then cut by using ghe oak as the fence. The ply edge is laid exacltly on the cut line and the blade _just_ touches it as it did when you made the board.. That's what makes it so easy and quick to use.

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Morris Dovey wrote:

Looks very nice, Morris. I presume that the saw carriage will be capable of rotating and locking 90 degrees so you can "cross cut" across the 4' dimension as well as ripping along the length.
If so, I'd consider adding a cam or clamp somewhere along the line to hold the panel tight for the cross cut operation as well as a simple counter-weight to pull the saw back up to the top position when used for cross cutting.
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Yuppers on the rotatable insert. Also plan to install a t-track for a flippable stop and a PSA tape rule. Should also be able to install other tools (like a router, roto-zip, etc) on additional inserts.

The counterweight is on the agenda. My thinking here hadn't gone beyond spring clamp. A built-in cam-type clamp had never even ocurred to me. Thanks!
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/panel_saw /
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Morris Dovey wrote:

[snip]

With regard to the cam-type clamp, it just occurred to me that you may be using varying thicknesses of ply or MDF. Mounting the cam clamp on some sort of springy material, maybe a longer piece of thin steel or thicker aluminum (to provide some self-adjustment as the material is clamped) would be the way to go. Afterall, the only thing you're trying to do is prevent the lateral movement of the stock on those "effortless" bearings <g>
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wrote:

Sorry, I can't possibly participate in a peer review until your development process documents have been approved.
(Only 13 weeks until retirement, thank god...)
Lee
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wrote:

So you are working in a place that is being "processed" to death to, eh?
Number of docs for a critical gate review: 220+ --- absolutely out of control. ... and that's just to determine whether they are applicable or should be tailored or tailored out.

+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+ If you're gonna be dumb, you better be tough +--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+
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On Sat, 30 Apr 2005 22:12:12 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Ya think? Scorecard for current project:     Number of people working on Process: 4     Number of people actually developing software: 1     Getting my ass out of here: priceless.
Lee
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<snip>

Number of weeks before the whole process is shipped to Bangalore: 22
Number of weeks before it was determined that the software produced in Bangalore was bug free, written to spec, and accomplished exactly the wrong objective: 4
Patriarch, thoroughly enjoying the sawdust therapy...
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software,
Lee...
Consider that they've been approved. Join in on the fun!
(Hang in there. You're on the home stretch.)
-- Morris
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wrote:

Just so I don't get stuck collecting the metrics.

Annoying my cow-orkers with the countdown, I assure you. :-)
Lee
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