Shed foundation quandary

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wrote:

You have to remember everything a good contractor brings to your house. Good insurance, a permit, and all the paperwork is in order. In most states he incurs all the liability for an injury one of his workers might have. You get to sit on the deck relaxing and get a quality job. Thank your government leaders tha he can't compete with you and your friend bubba to build your shed.
Mike M
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$3000 for a 10x12 slab? Ouch. Even if I built simple forms and dug it down so it was a full 12" thick all around it would cost less than $800 for 5 yards of concrete here (Washington State).
A slab that size is not difficult to do yourself (with a part time helper). Just build the forms, make sure they're square and level, and have some concrete delivered. Use a board to work out any air bubbles during the pour, then use a long board and your helper to screed off the concrete level with the forms.
You're not building a house, so I probably wouldn't worry about frost lines. Just let it float on top of the ground. It may move up and down with the freeze/thaw and end up slightly out of level, but so what? It's a shed.
For small pours like this, I prefer to use companies with trucks that mix concrete right on site. There's less waste and you only pay for the concrete you use.
Last time I priced an 8x12 shed, it was cheaper to pour a (4") concrete slab than to build a wood floor with 2x6 floor joists and plywood. Concrete is also nice if you're storing outdoor equipment such as mowers or tillers, since you don't need to worry about water running off onto the floor.
I would make the upper edge of the forms with 2x4's, then add filler boards underneath on the low end to accomodate the slope. You don't need to dig the whole area down to the same level, but I would probably try to dig out flat stepped areas so there's minimal risk of movement on the slope. I would also dig a little deeper around the perimeter to make "footings", how deep is up to you.
Plan to install some "J" concrete anchor bolts after screeding the concrete so you can bolt the shed to the slab once it's set up.
Even if the shed shifts over time, or you decide you want it in a different location, you can always move the shed and pour a new slab like we did:
http://www.mountainsoftware.com/projects/2005shed.htm
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com/anthony.htm
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On 8/5/2013 9:14 AM, HerHusband wrote:

On a 10 x 12 slab you will also want to factor in wire mesh/rebar (#3 on 16" centers would be my preference for a slab that size) if you want it to last ...
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On 8/4/2013 2:11 PM, MJ wrote:

I built my first shed, 10x12, sunk PT posts into pea gravel 12". It easily withstood a hurricane with no leaks.
New house and I let TuffShed build one this time. 8x14. I very much like this size more than the 10x12. It sets on top of concrete blocks and has a galvanized steel foundation. It can be anchored down if necessary. I paid about $3600 installed and two coats of paint with a 10 year warranty.
I would never go the expense of a concrete foundation.
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wrote:

on a slab it's good to have it up to where you have access if needed. Sono tubes can be a good way to go and are easy depending on what your frost level is. Helping the neighbor put in a 14 x 20 shed right now where we have 5' drop over the 14'. I have an excavator so it's working out with lots of big rocks available to build retaining walls. But there was the adventure when the ground gave way and I slipped down the side of a rock. Your talking two old guys looking at each other with big moon eyes as I wondered if I was going over, and he wondered if it was on him. Learned to wear the seat belt when the unknown can happen so all was well.
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