Sharpening TS Blades Yourself


What are the pros and cons of taking a file and running it across the carbon teeth of a 10" combination blabe a couple of times just to touch it up a bit?
Never seen a discussion of this before. Anyone care to comment?
Dan J
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 21:15:56 -0500, "Dan Jefferson"

It's a fine idea if you use a diamond file like the DMT series and stay with the existing profile.
Clean the blade thoroughly first, then test it.
Sometimes this can be enough, without using the files.
I clean my blades with Easy-Off Oven Cleaner and a brass wire brush.
Then I take them to the sink and wash them with soap and water.
Then I put DriCote on them.
It's funny how well a "dull" blade will cut after a thorough cleaning.
Tom Watson - WoodDorker
tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email)
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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I have always sharpened my own saw blades by hand. Circular, hand saws & chain saws. Regular files work fine on steel blades and the new diamond hones touch up carbides nicely. Just pay close attention to the various angles on the teeth and maintain those angles. It's just a matter of interest, concentration and practice to save yourself from the local saw mangler.<G> Bugs
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2006 21:15:56 -0500, "Dan Jefferson"

Not as good as taking a very small number of quid and buying yourself a cheap modern blade with carbide teeth (which are obviously fileproof). If you're using just the one "combination" blade, then you can probably improve your blade overall (and sharpen it) for very little money.
If you have a carbide blade, then try honing with a diamond file (DMT are about the best, and their little ones on a plastic handle are cheap). This will work if the blade is genuinely dull. However much wear on sawblades causes odd chipped teeth, rather than a general dulling, and you can't hone that away.
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I am lucky to have a firm that sharpens my blades to perfection. They are so good that cut wood is so smooth that it looks like it was just sanded. Our school district wood shop sends their NEW blades to have them trued and sharpened before they are put to use. WW
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Warren Weber wrote:

Can you share the name of this shop? And, do you know if they do mail order business?
Thanks.
-jav
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First, a file will not cut a carbide tooth. It will sharpen a carbon steel blade. But why? I have my carbide blades sharpened to perfection for less than $30.
Dave
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