sharpening on belt sander

Does anybody have experience sharpening (knives, plane irons) on a stationary belt sander? I just found a source for 300 and 800 grit belts and I thought it might work well though I understand I'll need to try to estimate the blade angle and hold it by hand. Thanks much. ---> Ed
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Works for my lawnmower blade.
For a precision tool, it can probably be made to work, but easy for an"oops" also. Ed
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I use a floor edger for my rough chisels. I use 100 grit. Eyeball the angle, a little on the backside too. I don't think 800 grit is going to last long against metal.
M Hamlin

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Haven't tried it myself, but look at FWW October 2003, page 15-16. This technique was described in Methods of Work, with a drawing of a jig to make it easier.
David
Ed Lowenstein wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@att.net (Ed Lowenstein) wrote in

I tried it a couple of times, with poor results. I think the problem is that the belt isn't a rigid surface, but instead can flex a bit just past the edge of the (chisel, in my case) being sharpened. This lead to more work than I expected on the stones. YMMV.
John
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I am assuming it is a regular 1x30 or 1x42 sander, Lee Valley Tools http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.asp?SID=&ccurrency=2&pageH040&category=1,43072 sells 15 micron grit belts, supposedly equivalent to 1000x Japanese waterstone. I've tried it, gives reasonably sharp edge on my chisels.

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They also have a leather belt and green honing compound ( 0.5 ). I regularly use the 15 belt and leather belt for sharpening and honing knives. You can set a steady rest at 25 or whatever angle and do a good job if you have a steady hand.
Preston

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Ed Lowenstein wrote:

Preferred by cutlers.
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On 6 Oct 2003 13:28:20 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@att.net (Ed Lowenstein) wrote:

It's not pretty, but it'll work in a pinch.
Keep the sparks out of the dust bag / collector.
Barry
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On 6 Oct 2003 13:28:20 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@att.net (Ed Lowenstein) wrote:

you can use it to grind but belt sanders are just not accurate enough for the final grits. You have to have a platten that is flat and accurate under the belt. that helps a lot. but you can't really freehand them on a belt sander. I can freehand grind on my makita and sharpen freehand. but when I need to grind a regular plane iron I use a tool rest.
--
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