Sharpening

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tiredofspam <nospam.nospam.com> wrote in

Thanks!! I'll try that.
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Like most everyone I have multiple systems.
Scary sharp, water stones, Arkansas stones, and an old delta water stone (primitive to Tormek), and a belt sander (1" wide belt) with a very find ziconia belt. Great for really nicked up tools, or lawn mower blades..
I use my water stones the most. The finish I get with an 8000 stone is beautiful. Mine are true water stones, I keep them in water full time. I put a drop or 2 of bleach and a drop or 2 of dishwash soap in the water to keep the scum down.
If you don't do a lot of sharpening scary is best/cheapest. But if you do a lot you will go through a lot of paper. BTW scary sharp on granite is much nicer than glass. Water will hold the paper down on granite, while it won't on glass.
I use the old delta stone when I want a hollow grind.
I could easily survive on scary sharp, or the water stones. The Arkansas stones are just plain ugly with oil. But I use my oil based slip stones for gouges.
Any system you choose can and will give you a good edge. I free hand sharpen except when I have a lot to take off to get rid of a nick. Then I put the blade in a holder. I think the freehand was worth the effort to learn. it takes a few seconds to get a nice edge without having to spend a lot of time setting up the blade in a holder or jig. A sharp edge is always safer than a dull edge.
On 12/10/2011 10:54 AM, Dr. Deb wrote:

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wrote:

I vote scarry.
-Zz
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On 12/10/2011 9:54 AM, Dr. Deb wrote:

As other have mentioned, I've tried a bunch of different methods (scary sharp included) and as of now I've settled on using one of these:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
with the standard 1000 grit stone to flatten the backs of blades and dial in the initial bevel, then I use a 4000 Norton water stone (by hand; my various blade-holding jigs now sit idle) to hone the edge, topped off by polishing on a leather strop (simple piece of leather glued smooth side down to a slab of thick plywood, and saturated with yellowstone compound). This method yields fabulous results (however, I do wish I had the 8000 grit Norton waterstone, but those things are EXPENSIVE), but (as Swingman laments) it IS messy. The Makita sharpener is a wonderful tool, but they are damn expensive these days ($300+; I gave around $200 for mine), and at this point I might be inclined to investigate the Worksharp WS3000 that Swingman mentions in another post. I'm sure it's far less messy than the Makita. I do still like my water stones though, and I don't think I'd give those up. I've tried lots of them, and in my opinion the Nortons are the best. I also have some diamond stones of various grits, but I only use them for rough work, sharpening my card scrapers, and flattening my waterstones.
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On Sat, 10 Dec 2011 09:54:20 -0600, Dr. Deb wrote:

I've used scary, water, and oil, plus some diamond hones for touching up router bits. I wound up sticking with oilstones (plus the hones).
Why? Waterstones were a little quicker than oilstones, but messier and oil doesn't cause rust. Plus waterstones require frequent flattening. More or less the same with ScarySharp, minus the flattening, plus I seemed to be tearing the paper quite a bit.
In the end, it's all a matter of what you like. I'm sure my decision was influenced not only by the above reasons, but because I've used oilstones all of my life.
I might have tried the diamond stones if I could afford them, since the hones work great on the router bits. But for the difference in price ...
P.S. I use whatever oil I have handy, but plain old mineral oil seems to work as well as any.
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I've used soft water stones, harder Shapton water stones, scary sharp, and now a Veritas sharpening machine. Soft water stones hollowed out almost immediately. I had to flatten them more than I used them. Shapton did not hollow out as much and were OK. But still slow. Scary sharp was a hassle to set up, change papers, mess, and slow. I'm pretty happy with the Veritas. It has a disc on top of the machine where you stick sandpaper. Has a guide for the chisels and plane blades. Quick. Not as messy as scary sharp. Produces razor sharp results due to the sandpaper spinning at a few hundred or so rpm. Couple grits on different platters and you can go from grinding to honed quickly.
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On Dec 10, 2:15pm, " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=48435&cat=1,43072
This is the one I have. I don't think it was this expensive 5-6-7-8 years ago. You can make your own sandpaper discs by just gluing and cutting sandpaper to fit the discs. No need to buy the Veritas brand sandpaper discs.
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wrote:

I use a 1" 120 grit zirconia-belted sandah to trim broken or chipped edges, a 600 diamond hone to sharpen, a coupla 1200-1600 grit WOD papers on any old flat surface (glass, laminate top, straight MDF; I'm not too picky) to polish, and finish off on a leather strop with LVT green compound (chromium + aluminum oxides).
I have some small, shaped 4000 waterstones for my gouges, but I often just use the diamond paddles or shaped rubber sanding pad with WOD paper on it when the stones are hiding. A piece of soft wood with a gouge jammed into it 90 degrees to the grain works well with some LVT green in it for honing, too.

I believe that both can provide a truly fine edge, equally. But stones cost hundreds of dollars more and take more time than my setup, plus you have to keep buying stones as they wear out or (Oops!) break.
As a SDFWA volunteer, I helped woodworking author Paul Anthony set up and do the sharpening clinics at the AWW show in Ontario, CA. He used diamonds and stones, noting how nicely diamonds quickly shaped an edge. We discussed (and he was open to) ScarySharp(tm) but I think he preferred his stones + diamonds since he was used to them.
Use whatever works for you, Doc.
-- A sound mind in a sound body is a short but full description of a happy state in this world. -- John Locke
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600 diamond for primary bevel / general sharpening. 1200 diamond for secondary / microbevel. Black surgical Arkansas for fine knives, where the mesh pattern on the 1200 stone would blunt the edge. Medium cotton buffing wheel and chrome green compound for quickly stropping off the stubborn last bit of wire edge. For tools you don't lend out, the whole sharpening sequence takes less than three minutes.
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wrote:

6" grinder (not a Tormek, a regular grinder with a white wheel) to establish the bevel (only if a new bevel is needed) . Then on to waterstones. 1000 grit until I get a wire edge, then 8000 grit to finish. Stropping after to touch up until time for a new sharpening.
No sharpening jig needed, the hollow grind from the grinder gives you a bevel that will naturally sit flat on the stone.
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