Setting up a new (used) table saw

I recently purchased a used Delta 10" Tilting Arbor Saw. I found mixed reviews on the saw, but at $450 for the saw and a 50" biesemeyer fence I figured it was a pretty good deal since most of the new contractor saws I had looked at were quite a bit more than that for just the saw.
I finally got the 220V outlet put into my garage/workshop for the saw (it only runs on 220) and have been setting it up over the last few evenings. I purchased a TS-Aligner (that I think is awesome BTW) to help me set up the saw and since this is my first TS I have a few questions. :-) I have aligned the fence using the TS-Aligner. I think I have it about as good as I am going to get it. When I run the aligner along the fence the reading fluctuates .002 of an inch in both directions along the face of the fence. Is this acceptable? Also, depending on which miter slot I measure from, the fence is either pretty much right on parallel or out of parallel by .003 of an inch or so. What is the tolerance between the miter gauges? Like I said this is my first TS so I have no idea how right on these measurements should be.
Also, I have purchased a biesemeyer anti-kickback splitter for the saw, but there is currently no slot in the insert for the splitter (it did not come with one when I bought it). What is the best way to cut this slot?
Thanks in advance for the help!
Josh
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Josh asks:

Which model?

You want to align the fence with the saw blade, which is what needs to be aligned with the miter slot. Go back to step one, align the blade with the slot, and THEN align the blade with the fence.
If there is any difference, make sure it is to the rear, with the distance opening up at the rear of the blade. This prevents pinching which can cause kickback.
Measure from the miter slot on the side on which you are making your cuts. The miter slots should be very, very close to parallel, but I don't recall what the specs are for Delta's saws right now. I wouldn't spend a whole lot of time worrying about .003", though.

Make a zero clearance insert. Cut the slot in the insert. Make the insert of phenolic, MDF, aluminum (soft alloy), your choice. Use the current insert to trace and outline. Bandsaw it out (scroll saw, jig saw, whatever's available). Rout the edges smooth aiming for a tight fit (drill a 3/4" hole all the way through the insert on the side opposite that where the blade rises for easy removal). You can either use tapped in adjustment screws to level the insert, or you can leave it be. Clamp to the table (in the insert hole) keeping clamps well clear of the where the blade will rise. Start the saw, blade down, and slowly bring the blade up into the new insert. Now, remove the insert and cut the slot for your splitter.
You will probably have to change to an 8" blade to be able to lower the blade below the bottom of the uncut insert. Or you can rout a short slot for relief where the blade will rise. Do NOT penetrate the entire insert.
It's really simpler than it sounds and it beats trying to modify a steel insert with mostly woodworking tools.
Charlie Self "A judge is a law student who marks his own examination papers." H. L. Mencken
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<snip good advice>

blade
relief
Just one comment for Josh, make a few inserts at once. You will need them.
Frank
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Thanks for the info. The model # is 36-755, but the previous owner had added a biesemeyer fence instead of the original jet-lock fence.
I had already aligned the blade to the miter slot using the ts-aligner (jr.) and was aligning the fence to the same miter slot. I don't think there is a way to align the fence directly to the blade using the ts-aligner.
Josh

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Josh writes:

Should be. I don't have my Aligner in my hand at the moment, but...if you can't figure a way to use that, try the old fashioned way.
Mark one blade tip at the front of the table (unplug that sucker first). Set the fence along the miter slot, as close to a dead on line up as you can. Measure from the blade tip to the fence. Rotate the blade so the tip is at the rear of the table (or as close as it gets, of course). Measure from the blade tip to the fence. Keep it up until you cannot see the difference, or until you've reached a 1/64th inch kickout at the rear of the blade. I think the Aligner will work for this, too, giving a much more precise measurement, but it's a bit more complex. I don't recall if it is in the tape or not, or the manual.
You're right, though: if the miter slot lines up with the blade and the fence lines up with the miter slot, all should be well. It just makes me itchy to introduce a third variable when two can be used.
Charlie Self "A judge is a law student who marks his own examination papers." H. L. Mencken
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On 01 Sep 2004 16:01:42 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

I would strongly endorse one particular point that Charlie makes -- and go a bit further (or maybe just add emphasis). Namely, purposely make the far end of the fence at least 2 hundredths of an inch farther from the miter slot than the near end is. Along the length of the fence that ain't much -- and it is much less along the length of the blade. But, it helps ensure that the far end is not closer to the slot than is the near end -- which, as Charlie suggested, can be bad, very bad. When I set up my first TS about a year ago I wanted everything perfectly parallel and used a dial gauge. But I realized that I should take into account small measuring mistakes that could be made and bumps of the fence here and there and wanted to err clearly on the side of safety. FWIW. -- Igor
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote in message
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Hi Charlie, hope all is going well.
snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote in message
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Ed Bennett responds:

Only argument there is that eventually the blade has to be part of the mix. As a preference, I'd use a Freud flat disc, after checking the arbor and arbor bearing for runout and, for the latter, flatness on its internal side.
Most people, though, are going to use the blade tips, I'll bet.
Still, if you're using the TSAligner, then there really isn't a whole lot of excuse for sloppy measuring, though I don't consider .003" sloppy with woodworking tool set-up. I see you don't, either.
Otherwise, I'm doing pretty well for a fat old guy who has bounced around too much in the past 3 years or so. Just got back from Atlanta Monday--not IWF, but a press deal for Ryobi--and am fairly well determined never to go there again. Too big, too crowded, too---much, I guess.
Considering I was born and raised just outside NYC, that's saying a lot, I think.
Charlie Self "A judge is a law student who marks his own examination papers." H. L. Mencken
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote in message
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Ed Bennet responds"
snip of agreement

Yeah, I was gonna say I'd like one like the one you did for Wood, but I don't have the resources of Meredith behind me, so...
Anyway, I agree with your next paragraph, and will steal it for my own use if you don't mind.
Charlie Self "A conservative is a man with two perfectly good legs who, however, has never learned to walk forward." Franklin D. Roosevelt, radio address, Oct. 26, 1939
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Ed, I'll agree with all else, but pick on the fence rear distance. I had some problem with slight burning with several woods, and tried adjusting the fence rear away from the blade by: 0, .002, .005, .010, etc. In most cases, .006 was enough, but items such as thick cherry needed about twice that. Going further did not produce any additional benefit.
As an aside, I just moved cross-country, and had to reassemble and align everything, virtually from scratch. This includes the TS, RAS, jointer, BS, DP, router table, chop saw and others. A full day's work, and the TS-aligner paid for itself yet again. And with that platform fixture and indicator tips, it's still the fastest and most accurate way I've ever found to set jointer knives.
GerryG (An old and satisfied TS-aligner customer)
On 1 Sep 2004 12:35:27 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@ts-aligner.com (Ed Bennett) wrote:

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Hi Gerry,
Good to hear from you!
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Which model? Off hand, I'd agree sounds like a good/great deal.

said
should
Tolerance between the miter *slots*? Not sure, in any case .002/.003 sounds damned good to me. I wouldn't spend any more time chasing a coupl'a thou's.
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Hey Josh, You are being loaded with some of the best info possible by some of the most knowledgeable. The problem is...is that you can get over loaded because these guys can stay on this topic for two weeks and constatntly add new stuff (no offense meant to Charlie and the gang). My latest Shop Notes Vol. 13 Issue 77 covers this very thing and what your responders have been talking about...but it goes one step further....ITS GOT PICTURES. Now that's how this dumb ol weekend woodworker likes it!!!! You should be able to purchase it at www.ShopNotes .com. It has both the basic align and the fancy thingamajig aligners. Hope this helps.
Joey

I
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but
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