seasoning lumber

Hello Group, I want to make a railing set in my house from rough sawn- hand planed oak. The rails (2 sets of 3) will slide into the posts via dovetail grooves. Rails will be 5 x 3 and the posts (2 sets of 2)will vary in size with the largest about 6x4. If I stack the posts near my woodstove this winter, how long do you think I need to let them dry before I can plane and machine them? (The rails have been sawn about 5 years ago- I got them from a friend.) Are there any guidelines about thickness, length, etc. that govern warm air drying? Thanks in advance for your answers.
Marc
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Rule of thumb is 1 year of air drying for each inch thickness. Probably not best to put them near the wood stove as they might get too dry and expand later on. After drying put them in the house for a week or two to get them aclimated to the moisture conditions in the house.

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Put the thumb back. http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/tmu/publications.htm
All kinds of seasoning and storing publications based on empirical information.
Key is where they start. If cut and stored for 5 years, they're pretty close to the MC that equates to the relative humidity in which they were stored. The key is to get them closer to the conditions where they will be used.
I'd let them adjust a couple of weeks, all sides open to air indoors, then mill them in stages to see what develops.
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