Sealing the lids on paint tins

Page 5 of 6  
On 05/07/2011 15:30, Moonraker wrote:

I find a couple of layers of Tesco bags does the trick equally well actually - at least it's a use for the bloody things.
Embarrassing confession - I employed a pro decorator a few months ago for the first time in my life. I was very intrigued that he had a new Special Box which he stored all his used brushes in; only it wasn't one of those where the bristles sit in turps, ISTR there was some form of chemical vapour in there which prevented the brushes from drying out indefinitely. He said it was the mutt's nuts and he'd pretty well given up on turps and brush cleaner. Can't remember what the stuff was though...
David
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Lobster wrote:

Tesco bags are probably the worst choice for that, especially if they're more than a few weeks old, their bags bio/photo/oxi-degrade very quickly ...

Been mentioned before, I think.
http://www.brushmate.co.uk /
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On Tue, 05 Jul 2011 19:45:51 +0100, Andy Burns

A painter I know said "if you clean and re-use your brushes you don't value your time highly enough" Every job gets a new brush.
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On Tue, 05 Jul 2011 23:30:02 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I use the cling film trick when a job needs to go from one day to the next. Also a couple of supermarket bags one from each end and tucked down over paint trays and rollers.
Cleaning non-water soluable paints etc is a PITA. I'd go for the new brush everytime if I could find a source of decent brushes at a sensible price that aren't part of a various sized set.
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Dave.




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Dave Liquorice wrote:

You can get one size packs from screwfix and the like. I tend to get cheapies and throw them for all undercoats and a Harris or something like that for finishing and then immediately clean it.
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On 7/6/2011 3:49 AM, Dave Liquorice wrote:

Jeez learn to clean the brush. I would much much rather clean an oil based paint or stain than water based. If you use mineral spirits, the kind that comes in a metal container vs the plastic contain, you can clean varnish out of a brush in a matter of seconds.
Keep in mind that is a good practice to clean the brush several times a day even with water based, don't use paint thinner to clean the brush, it dries much more slowly than mineral spirits and if you are painting above your head you will get thinned paint running down the handle.
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Dave Liquorice wrote:

Try this technique:
1. Swish brush in 100% mineral spirits ten times. Remove excess (I use a brush spinner). 2. Swish brush in 50-50 mix of mineral spirits and alcohol ten times. Remove excess. 3. Swish brush in 100% alcohol ten times. Remove excess.
Done.
For latex or water-based paints, add fabric softener to the water in which you swish the brush.
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On 7/7/2011 12:21 AM, HeyBub wrote:

Don't forget to exhale ten times.
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And spin around three times whilst scratching your ear.
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On 7/6/2011 8:21 AM, HeyBub wrote:

For cleaning brushes, a spinner is mandatory. Something like this:
http://tinyurl.com/3dq464p
My method is to use a jar/can just big enough for the brush. Put in a small amount of solvent and clean out the brush, then spin the brush in a cardboard box. Dump the small amount of dirty solvent in a different jar or can. Repeat several times.
Save the old dirty thinner, and next time, all the heavy pigments settle to the bottom and the old thinner is now clean.. Use the old thinner to clean next time, only using a bit of new thinner for the last couple of cleans. This is really easy, uses almost no thinner and really keeps your brushes nice.
You need 3 cans/jars to do this, one for storing old thinner, one to clean the brush, and an intermediate one to store the newly dirty thinner. When done, pour the dirty thinner into the old thinner storage can. You can use lacquer thinner but lacquer suspends the pigments forever, while turps or mineral spirits lets the pigments drop to the bottom, leaving clean thinner.
Don't use your good oil brushes for water based paints (hide them from your wife). Clean the cheaper plastic water brushes with just water and the spinner, or throw them away after your wife paints (and never ever cleans a brush)...
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Jack
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That works.

I also save dirty thinners and allow the pigments to settle.

By Lacquer thinners do you mean Cellulose thinner? However using Cellulose/Lacquer type thinners will destroy the natural spring in the brush resulting in a useless floppy brush.
You have described the above method the wrong way round though, Turps will coagulate the paint whereas Cellulose or as you call it lacquer thinner will draw the paint completely out of the bristle stock, as does mineral Naphtha but Naphtha will not destroy the spring in a natural bristle brush.

Stephen.
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On 7/7/2011 2:21 PM, snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:
I don't know, by lacquer thinner I mean the stuff I used to paint cars with when I was a kid, and now buy at Home Depot in a can that says "lacquer thinner" on it.

I believe you but I've used it often. I use lacquer thinner a lot for all sorts of cleaning things. I just know that when I use mineral spirits or paint thinner, the pigments settle out, but when I use lacquer thinner, they seem to remain suspended indefinitely.

I guess you are saying to use lacquer for the initial heavy cleaning and finish up with paint thinner? That would work but Paint thinner works fine and I can reuse the thinner after the pigments all settle out. I don't like using used lacquer thinner as it doesn't settle clear, even after long periods, so I'm throwing out lots of thinner.
I haven't seen or used "turps" since I was a kid. I use paint thinner or mineral spirits, because that's what I see on the shelves at a reasonable cost. I don't even know what "Naphtha" is. I've seen the word used a lot around here, and have looked it up a few times. I still don't know what it is, and I ain't looking it up again, cause I know I'll forget anyway. I think Naphtha was some kind of yellow soap when I was a young?
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You must be from the USA.
Your lacquer thinner will be the same as what we in the UK call Cellulose thinner which is indeed used in vehicle painting or spraying.

The lacquer/cellulose thinner is a very powerful solvent and has many uses, I have a five gallon tub of this in my garage.
Mineral spirit is the same as Turps, but in the UK we call it Turpentine, Turps for short or turps substitute.

You can use either for the initial cleaning but I find the cellulose or naphtha more effective at removing the paint from a brush than turps.
The thinner acts the same way as Naphtha both being very volatile, the mineral spirit however does not clean a paint brush on its own by simply standing the brush in the solvent, only after thorough cleaning the brush is it better served being suspended in mineral spirit which is almost exactly the same as white spirit that I believe you would call a Stoddard solvent in the USA.

As a reminder from the www,
Naphtha is a term usually restricted to a class of colourless, volatile, flammable liquid hydrocarbon mixtures. Obtained as one of the more volatile fractions in the fractional distillation of petroleum (when it is known as petroleum naphtha), in the fractional distillation of coal tar (coal-tar naphtha), and in a similar distillation of wood (wood naphtha), it is used widely as a solvent for various organic substances, such as fats and rubber, and in the making of varnish. Because of its dissolving property it is important as a cleaning fluid; it is also incorporated in certain laundry soaps. Coal-tar (aromatic) naphthas have greater solvent power than petroleum (aliphatic) naphthas. Originally the term naphtha designated a colourless flammable liquid obtained from the ground in Persia. Later it came to be applied to a number of other natural liquid substances having similar properties. Technically, gasoline and kerosene are considered naphthas.
Stephen.
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On 7/8/2011 2:43 PM, snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

Yes.
The US has a bunch of names for lacquer types too, I don't understand any of them.

When I was a kid painting cars and such, I always had a 5 gallon can of the cheap stuff, for cleaning, primer coats and such. A gallon can of the good, high gloss stuff. I don't have a clue what I get at Home Depot, I don't paint cars any more.

I think there are technical differences in the US as well, although most people use the terms interchangeably. I threw in Terps just to be wordy:-)

I spin the hell out of it with a spinner. Usually comes pretty clean first time, nice and clean the second, and really clean the third.
only after thorough

Don't know about Stoddard solvent. After I clean a (good) brush I wrap it in a cardboard wrapper that came with the brush, or one I made.
I don't even know what "Naphtha"

The following reminder is the reason I quit looking it up. Whole lot of words that makes it clear as mud to me. Naphtha sounds pretty much like lacquer thinner to the untrained eye:-) I was right about the soap however, and it was Fels Naphtha bar soap my mother used to have in the laundry tubs. I replaced it with GoJo and Lava when I was into cars.

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On 7/7/2011 11:51 AM, Jack Stein wrote:

I heard THAT. I've had more than one $20 Purdy brush ruined by the wife...
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On Wed, 06 Jul 2011 09:49:07 +0100 (BST), "Dave Liquorice"

What's half an hour of time worth? For a DIY job you can mabee forget about it - but commercially that buys a pretty decent brush.
For day to day, the cling wrap in the refrigerator works well. And the same painter, when doing apartments etc - all the same colour - DOES stretch a brush - uncleaned - that way.
He buys his brushes in bulk from a brush distributor - and his roller sleeves.
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brushes? I have some I paid about 15p each for but they ain't for putting gloss on doors.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

He must be made of money unless he uses cheap brushes and by using cheap throw away brushes how does he produce a decent finish. This painter can't value his work very much.
Stephen.
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snipped-for-privacy@btinternet.com wrote:

I buy semi expensive brushes. Can't imagine throwing them away after every job. It does not take long to clean a brush specially if you use a paint cleaning comb.
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Mineral Naphtha and Linseed oil was what we used to store our paint brushes in, the oil stopped the naphtha from evaporating too quickly, the naphtha will draw out paint completely from the brush stock or bristle base.
Leaving a brush in a turpentine derivative will simply congeal the remainder of paint left in the bristles.
Stephen.
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