Sealing the lids on paint tins

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On Tue, 5 Jul 2011 20:11:59 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@cucumber.demon.co.uk (Andrew Gabriel) wrote:

Skins form with the can in any orientation, trust me.

http://goo.gl/0UizX The proper tool. Buy one with the widest, longest tip for the best results. Paint stores usually have a can of 100 or so on the checkout counter.
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On Tue, 5 Jul 2011 20:11:59 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Gabriel wrote:

The tin of emulsion from TS was so thin that a screwdriver would have opened it - like a can opener! The best tool I found for the job was an old metal tyre lever (push-bike size) that id rounded and smoothed about 40 years ago. Plenty of area and no sharp edges. Then "stir thoroughly": even a plastic kitchen thingy (overgrown spoon, metal handle) deformed the can, so a metal stirrer... )h, also about 5mm of freeboard in a 5 litre can...
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On 7/5/2011 5:36 AM, steve robinson wrote:

New air or not the paint will skim over, better on bottom than on top.
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Does this have the effect of creating an artificial bottom that keeps the paint closer to the top when the lid is opened? I've noticed polyurethane especially likes to create thick layers on top that must be broken through.
Puckdropper
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On 7/5/2011 5:02 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

It is a temp bottom, if it has skimmed over on the bottom it probably needs to be stirred and there goes the bottom, but it is on the bottom.
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On Tue, 5 Jul 2011 10:36:34 +0000 (UTC), "steve robinson"

Fill the can with CO2 before closing - no oxygen to react with the driers in the paint. CO2 is heavier than air, so displaces the air and stays in the can. Storing the can upside down just puts the "skin" on the bottom
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On Tue, 5 Jul 2011 10:36:34 +0000 (UTC), "steve robinson"

Just make sure you use a paint strainer after opening a can the second time.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

This reminds of a question I did not quickly locate the answer to on the web. I have never bought bought paint in greater than 1 gallon units. They are easy to shake and pour into paint trays, etc. What is the usual process for using a *5 gallon* container of paint? I assume it has to be mixed really well (practical to do by hand?) and that a "paint ladle" of some sort would be handy.
Bill
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On 7/6/2011 2:02 AM, Bill wrote:

The 5 gallons get mixed if you pick a non stock color, but we get them shook regardless. You pour out of them just as you would a 1 gallon container, you just have to be more careful and have a paint brush handy to clean up the drips down the sides. The biggest problem with the 5 gallon buckets is getting the lid off. A 5 in 1 comes in handy for that. also consider switching from a roller tray to a roller bucket. With the waste basket style paint buckets for rollers you can easily dump a gallon of paint into them and not waste time refilling all day long. We typically refill our roller paint buckets a couple times a day maybe three times on a long day. Plus they are much easier to carry around.
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wrote:

ALL of the 5 gallon paint pails I've ever bought/used had pour spout like a 5 gallon pail of oil - so decanting is VERY simple, and relatively clean. Just a swipe with the paint brush as you stop pouting, and a quick wipe with a damp (thinners or spirits for oil paint) rag before replacing the cap.
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On 05/07/2011 11:33, Huge wrote:

You don't need to store them upside down (which as others have pointed out means any skin is under the paint and hard to deal with) simply inverting them once so paint seals the edge of the lid seems to make a difference to me.
Andy
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On 7/6/2011 6:42 AM, Andy Champ wrote:

Makes sense.
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On 7/5/2011 11:26 AM, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I transfer leftover paints to nice clean glass jars. Takes up less space, and makes it easy to see the colour.
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Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Or use an inflated plastic bag to fill the void.
(I started off writing "blow up a plastic bag...", but I suspect this is one problem that wouldn't be best solved with explosives :)
--
Andrew



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On 05/07/2011 13:31, Andrew Morton wrote:

Cue the "Mr Bean does decorating" clip from Youtube...
David
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On 5/07/2011 8:26 PM, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Yea right - every time I do that with compresses gas it usually blows the lid off :)
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john brook wrote:

Oxygen is the enemy of unused paint. Here are some tips:
* Don't paint out of the can. Pour paint into another container and re-seal the can. * When finished painting, return the unused paint to the can, then - pay attention here - EXHALE three times into the can. This replaces most of the oxygen with carbon dioxide. * Use a plastic bag as your friend suggested. It acts like a gasket around the edges. * Store the can upside down. Any remaining oxygen will cause a thin film to form on what will be the bottom of the paint next time you open the can. * Make sure the lid is on tightly. Else some paint will leak out, firmly attaching the lid to the shelf such that when you grab the can, the lid stays on the shelf, the remaining paint plops to the floor, and you have an empty can in your hand.
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Only if you are an alien? Typical human exhalations have only 4%~5% carbon dioxide in place about the same amount of oxygen leaving ~15% oxygen (plus added water vapour).
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Robin wrote:

OR: put a thin plastic bag into the can and tuck it in so that it contacts the paint and leaves the open end outside the can, putting the lid on inside the open end of the bag would mean that air could not get to the paint surface. A bit like the old idea of a greaseproof paper round on top of jam.
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On 05/07/2011 13:35, Mrcheerful wrote:

I simply pour gently, a small amount of turps on the paint, this in my experience stops it skimming and is easily stirred in before the next use. Another thing I have found useful is if I use a paint brush then need to continue the job the next day wiping any excess paint off then firmly wrapping the paint brush in cling film, keeps the brush usable until the morrow.
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