screws in cutting board

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Do you see any problem putting decking type screws between slats when makin g a cutting board. This would be done to help hold it together while gluein g and for added strength and resistance to bowing. I seem to have trouble w hen I just clamp everything. It gets bowed. my plan would be to pre drill h oles and screw together 4 slats at a time (and also glue). Then I would att ach these sub assembles and glue them together somehow. Maybe inserting dow els for extra strength. Just been thinking. I am using maple.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com writes:

It would probably be better to first identify _why_ your cutting board bows when you clamp it. Could be the material is too thin, or more likely, your boards aren't square.
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There are two reasons I can think of at the moment why your glueups bow...
1. The edges aren't square
2. Your clamps aren't set properly. If, for example, all the clamps go across one side of what you are clamping and if the pressure isn't at the middle of the edges, tightening the clamps will bow the wood. The easy way to avoid that is to alternate the clamps, top and bottom; i.e., one on the top, next (a distance away) on the bottom, next on the top, etc.
As you tighten the clamps, you should use a straight edge across the boards to assure all are flat; if not, you can tweak it by tightening/loosing clamps on the appropriate side.
As far as the screws go, I see no problem in doing so, just use something that doesn't rust.
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dadiOH
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On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 07:44:38 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

One possible cause of bowing could be your clamping pressure may be too high. To counteract the bowing, cauls positioned above and below your work piece and perpendicular to your clamps could solve the problem.
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On Tue, 16 Dec 2014 11:41:33 -0600

This gets my vote as most probable cause.
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Electric Comet wrote:

FWIW, when I was in high school we sent the initial glue-up through the jointer and planer to take care of Minor slippage.
Bill
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What thickness ? of maple. .. others mentioned clamping pressure .. .. perhaps more of a problem with thin stock ? John T.
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Sounds like a bad idea. Rust comes to mind. You might have to get stainless steel screws if you really must use screws.
On 12/16/2014 10:44 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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On 12/16/2014 5:45 PM, mungedaddress wrote:

Not saying that rust would not be bud, but would rust really be a problem?
The screw is there only to assist with glue up. If it rusted what would it matter?
Just food for thought. I often use 23 gauge pins for preventing creep and they have never been an issue.
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Do you see any problem putting decking type screws between slats when making a cutting board. <snip> --------------------------------------------------------- Yes, since they are totally unnecessary.
If you want to reduce "creep" in your glue up, break there job into multiple glue ups.
If the total glue up is 16 strips, then do 8 glue ups of 2 strips each.
When dry, do 4 glue ups of 4 strips each.
When dry, do 2 glue ups of 8 strips each.
When dry, proceed.
You have 16 strips glued together with minimum "creep" while making only a single joint with each glue up.
Lew
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I would be concerned about rust, and with "decking type" screws I'd be concerned about what they're plated with (which most likely should not be anywhere near food).
If alignment is the issue, I'd use wood dowels.
John
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I've been thinking about dowels since about the first post... No chance of ruining an edge because a blade knicked a screw. Biscuits or dominoes may also be used.
Puckdropper
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ing a cutting board. This would be done to help hold it together while glue ing and for added strength and resistance to bowing. I seem to have trouble when I just clamp everything. It gets bowed.
Bad idea. If the stock sides are parallel, the parts could be creeping and sliding. You could try sprinkling a tiny bit of sand between the boards to prevent slipping. Also, as has been said, use cauls to hold the top and bot tom flat.
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On 12/16/14, 7:03 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

That's something I learned early. Now, I often glue up just wide enough to fit through the planer, then glue those together. It's a lot fewer seems to scrape.
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On 12/16/14, 11:46 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

I would forget about the biscuits or dowels as none will stop bowing. Cauls are the best option and these clamps make best most efficient use of them...
http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/125392/woodriver-clamping-system.aspx
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-MIKE-

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Theoretically would screws stop bowing?
On Wednesday, December 17, 2014 12:18:43 AM UTC-6, -MIKE- wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Gluing your strips in alternating directions will help stop bowing. Theoretically, cursing at the wood will stop it from bowing--or at the very least, make it think twice.

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On 12/17/2014 7:37 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Only if your clamps don't bow.
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I am currently building 6 cutting boards with 20 pieces of maple each. I simply glued 5 together and clamped, then I glued 4 sets of those together. I had very slight slip. This was pretty fast for me, I glued up 22 groups of 5 in less than 2 hours.
You could use screws but that is going to take significantly longer and will be a potential hazard if you need to trim after glue up.
Use clamps on top and bottom to guard against bowing.
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On 12/17/2014 7:26 AM, Leon wrote:

For what is is worth, this is what, this is what I am building. LABOR INTENSIVE!
http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/video/the-coolest-cutting-board-ever.aspx
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