Screw (ed)

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I'm affixing the face frame for the buffet to the leg/side assembly. The legs are 1 1/2 hard maple. The face frame is 3/4 hard maple, in which I drilled 3/8 deep 1/2 inch hole to accommodate the screw and a plug. Drilled a pilot hole to depth.
I used 1 1/2 inch number 8 McFeeley coarse thread square drive screws. Four of the six screws snapped after I removed the clamps.
My guess is that I had too much torque on the driver. I'm going to redrill and use number 10 screws.
Any other thoughts?
Larry
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On 2/15/2013 4:47 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

are 1 1/2 hard maple. The face frame is 3/4 hard maple, in which I drilled 3/8 deep 1/2 inch hole to accommodate the screw and a plug. Drilled a pilot hole to depth.

I am guessing that they may have snapped during insertion. I have had screws snap like this and give not any indication other than a faint tick sound, similar to how wood will often give that tick sound when being stressed. Or you got a really bad batch of screws.
If you were using an impact driver this can happen more easily, if driven with a clutched drill the screw should not have broken.
Th pilot holes should be at least the diameter of the root of the screw.
Regardless, a broken screw sucks. Four broken screws is a quad suck.
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On 2/15/2013 5:47 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

are 1 1/2 hard maple. The face frame is 3/4 hard maple, in which I drilled 3/8 deep 1/2 inch hole to accommodate the screw and a plug. Drilled a pilot hole to depth.

Did you wax the screws? I always was using a candle in hardwoods. Did you drill the pilot the same size as the shank, in maple this is a must, most other hard woods too, not softwoods.
--
Jeff

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You may be correct ... I use only fine threads in hardwood if I have a choice.
--
www.ewoodshop.com (Mobile)

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woodchucker wrote:

"Swingman" wrote:

I've never had a problem using coarse thread sheet metal self tapping screws in maple and white oak; however, use a pilot drill that is 75% of the thread OD.
Lew
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The woodworkers show was in town today and I brought one of the broken screws and a sample to get some opinions from the graybeards. Here's what they had to say:
1. Square drive screws don't allow the driver to slip off -- like philips head -- when the screw is tight leading to breakage if I overtighten. 2. Screw should be lubed -- soap or wax. 3. Pilot hole should be larger diameter than I chose. 4. There was too much torque on the Makita driver. My driver does not have adjustable torque, but the drill does.
So, I took some scrap and used the same screw, drilled a larger pilot hole, lubed the screw with dish soap and drove it with drill at a lower torque setting. Worked fine, problem solved.
Larry
On Friday, February 15, 2013 4:47:40 PM UTC-6, Gramp's shop wrote:

are 1 1/2 hard maple. The face frame is 3/4 hard maple, in which I drilled 3/8 deep 1/2 inch hole to accommodate the screw and a plug. Drilled a pilot hole to depth.

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Wax only, never soap. Soap will absorb water from ambient humidity, which promotes corrosion of the screw.
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On 2/16/2013 11:31 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Years ago I read a tip somewhere about using beeswax for driving screws. I have in the shop a small jar (think it was creamed herring which was good and the current contents are equally good but in a much different way)
Pick up the cheapest wax toilet seal you find at Menard's or wherever and carefully melt it down - I did mine a little at a time in a Pyrex measuring cup in the microwave. I think the original tip was to use a double boiler.
The full jar will last you a couple of lifetimes and the consistency is just about perfect. Unscrew the cap, poke the screw into the wax and drive it home. No flakes of wax like with canning wax and if you find you get too many holes in the surface (I did... ONCE) just put it back and heat it up and it's back like "new."
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Just about any thing will work, I prefer a sealable can of what ever furniture wax I have in the garage. I already have it and it can be closed up, not terribly expensive. I have installed more wax rings than I care to admit, while they make an excellent screw lube I find them way too sticky for my liking.
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You know, it's a whole lot easier to just buy a can of Johnson's Paste Wax. :-)
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On 2/17/2013 11:57 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

LOL! Yeah, I know but...
It's also easier to buy furniture, hire in somebody to do our remodeling, build our decks, etc. but it's what WE do<g>
Besides, I believe I got my wax ring for <$1 at a garage sale. It was even new<g>
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On 2/17/13 11:57 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Canning wax, those small blocks of paraffin sold in grocery stores, are super cheap. You can break them up and keep little blocks in all your tool boxes or wherever is convenient. They have no carriers, like many other spray or canned waxes... just 100% inert paraffin. It's great for screws, miter slots/rails, making jigs slippery, etc.
I don't know how it affects a wood finish or stain, but I do know it doesn't soak into the grain like a paste might.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Not to mention the water that is in the soap to begin with..
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On 2/17/13 9:07 AM, Leon wrote:

And don't even think about putting a screw into oak. It'll ruin your life.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 2/17/13 2:19 PM, Mike Marlow wrote:

Or it might esplode!
--

-MIKE-

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"-MIKE-" wrote:

Ever hear of 316L S/S?
Lew
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On 2/17/13 3:59 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

It's oak rust, Lew. It'll eat through kryptonite. :-)
--

-MIKE-

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"-MIKE-" wrote:

That's 316L S/S, NOT 304 (AKA: 18-8) which is sometimes good for pots and pans.
Try it, you'll like it.
Lew
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316L is low carbon and 316 is steel that takes hot salt water and won't rust. It is the best.
Another thing is epoxy coated screws. They are tough and coated.
Martin
On 2/17/2013 7:38 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

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The real solution to oak rust is not to let oak rust. Drill out the area and glue a dowel in its place. You can either extend the dowel with glue out to be the fastener, or screw through the dowel.
Dominos would probably work as well, but be sure you liberally coat the tool with that non-stick or whatever you guys were talking about.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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