sawing curved edges with jigsaw

Hello all,
I'm an amateur wookworker, and do not have a whole lot of tools in my possession. However, a do have the basic tools.
I am looking for tricks to make a curved edge sawed with a jigsaw look professionally smooth. Whenever i saw a curved edge on a board for exemple, i first draw the curved edge i want to cut, and then saw along the edge slowly with my jigsaw. In tricky areas along the saw path (e.g. tight curves), i try to clear the drawn edge maybe 2 millimeters, so i can file it afterwards down to the drawn edge. I find this technique tiresome, and i find it hard to achieve a mathematically smooth and continuous edge.
If your suggestions include using a flush trim router bit, don't hesistate, cause i just purchased one.
Also, at what speed should i set my jigsaw when sawing a complex (non straight) edge??? I've been sawing with my jigsaw speed set at MAX. Any reasons why I shouldn't? If not, what are these slower speed settings for then?
Thanks in advance for the tips.
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Zed Rafi asks:

Generally, a slower speed makes for easier control. But you leave out an important bit of information: jigsaws are one tool where all the hype about "buy the best and only cry once" is true. What brand are you using?
Unless you're using a router table, the bearing on the flush trim router bit is going to follow the surface you've already cut.
Charlie Self "There are two ways of exerting one's strength: one is pushing down, the other is pulling up." Booker T. Washington
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wrote:

not too bad an approach. you'll likely find it easier to "fair" the curve on a template than on the actual workpiece.
some words to do searches on: trammel jig french curve spring stick Pat Warner ellipse

a good tool. got a router to put it in? <G>
now you need to practice making templates.

depends on material, thickness, hardness, etc. experiment and use what works.

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Here is the jig I was refering to :
http://www.diynet.com/diy/hi_tools/article/0,2037,DIY_13936_2912802,00.html

curved
hesistate,
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You can make a sled for your saw to ride on in the arc. Kind of like a circle jig for your router.

curved
hesistate,
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"Zed Rafi" wrote in message

First make a template of the curve with appropriate thickness mdf. The more effort you put in the template, the happier you will be with the final results.
To make the template, layout the curve and use the band/jig saw and a rasp to rough cut, then sandpaper glued to flexible strips to the smooth the curve _exactly_ as you want it.
Once the template is to your satisfaction, use it layout the curve on the workpieces, band/jig saw to rough cut the curve, then, with double sided tape to hold the template and workpiece together, finish up with your router and flush trim bit ... preferably on a router table.
If possible, design your template, and rough cut your workpieces, a bit oversize past both ends of the curve, then trim the workpiece to final size after routing, thereby removing any tearout on end grain or at end of router cuts.
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What kind of jigsaw do you have? The first & best thing you can do is to get a high quality saw like a Bosch or Milwaukee.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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i've got a VERY basic jigsaw. it's a Black & Decker corded jigsaw, that i got for very cheap (50 canadian bucks). I imagine these jigsaws are considered absolute crap to the experienced woodworker, but it seems to work fine for the occasional use i make of it.

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wrote:

the difference between that and a high end saw is remarkable.
if you're using it only to rough cut before trimming with the router you may not care, and high end machines are expensive. a high end jigsaw will still not do as clean or accurate a job as a router and template setup.
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i'm sure. my jigsaw feels soooo cheap, it's even got a toy-like feel to it.
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wrote:

So did I... I had a $35 USD Craftsman special for years. Then I borrowed a good Bosch. The difference was amazing. I bought the Milwaukee for myself and invested in good blades.
If you want to improve your results - consider buying a better saw. But even then I get the best results out of (a) using a bandsaw instead and/or (b) using an Oscillating Spinder Sander after the cut.
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