Sanding shellac finish

I'm about to apply Minwax water base polyacrylic satin finish to some maple pieces. The manufacturer recommends 3 coats, sanding between coats with 220 paper.
I was told that instead of using 220 paper, the same effect can be achieved with gray (extra fine) Scotch teflon pads.
Does anybody have any experience with this method, good or bad?
TIA, JR
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Brown maybe. But the greys are _very_ fine (and not Teflon either)
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Teflon? I thought that was for frying pans so your eggs won't stick? Anyway, extra fine synthetic steel wool, if that's what you are talking about, is MUCH finer than 220 sandpaper. It won't provide any tooth for the finish to adhere to, which is why you are instructed to sand between coats.
dave
JR wrote:

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JR wrote:

On shellac, as indicated by your subject line, or on polyurethane, as indicated by the body of your text? :)
Sorry, couldn't resist. Anyway, no, I haven't used the 3M pads. I've used steel wool with good effect on polyurethane. I use sandpaper on shellac, because it seems to work better to me. I usually have quite a lot to sand off with shellac, since I haven't mastered getting a thin, even coating.
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JR, FWIW . . . I have used the Minwax product for several projects. I like for 'working' items because it gives a HARD, durable, finish.
I use the same general technique/schedule as when I apply a deep Marine Varnish. 'Raw' wood - sand to 150 - 220grit. Vacuum, wipe with water dampened lintless cloth {at this point you can allow the wood to dry, then sand & wipe again, or apply first coat}
First Coat - apply THIN & SMOOTH - when dry, lightly sand with 220 grit, vacuum, wipe with dampened cloth Second Coat - same process, only use 320 grit Third Coat - same process, 400 grit Forth Coat - same process - for Gloss, apply thinly, let dry. 'Polish' with a good paste wax, and buff to a deep shine. For SATIN . . . instead of waxing, evenly rub with medium 3-M pad . . . in ONE direction.
EXPERIMENT to find which 'coarseness' of the pads YOU favor. The NON-METAL synthetics are recommended for 'between coat' rub downs because they DON'T leave fine ferrous particles which will react with the water vehicle and cause RUST STAINS between coats.
Regards & Good Luck, Ron Magen Backyard Boatshop {PS: To me, 3 coats are just the BASE . . . I typically use at least 6 coats for depth and a long 'service life' }

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