sanding disks

I've just bought a random orbit sander any recommendations for what grade of grit disks I should get. I can buy quite cheaply (per disk) if I buy in batches of 100 but I dont want to be stuck with a load grades that i will never use
Tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom: As an interim measure, you might do well to pay more for smaller quantites and figure out what you do the most. I buy them in 25-50 packs and get fairly good price breaks even at Lowe's or HD. Generally speaking:
- #80 is the most aggresive I use, mostly for stubborn paint removal. I also use these to shape wood on some sculptured projects I build. - #120 to #150 gets a fair amount use as I start finish sanding and I probably use as many of these disks as any other grit. - As I move to the #220 grits or finer I use sheet paper on a more gentle pad sander or a block, depending on the job.
I bought so many #80 disks several years ago I will probably have them around most of my life, if the paper doesn't rot off first. Be careful using aggresive grits - some random orbit sanders can remove a lot of material fast - too fast. As I noted, coarse grits on a peppy random orbit machine makes a pretty good wood sculpting machine.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That depends on what you intend to use the sander for. BUT,
Mine is a PC right angle 2 hand ROS. I use it for initial for over all sanding after assemble to insure joints and unions are smooth. I finish off with a PC SpeedBloc finish sander. I use 150 grit 99% of the time on the ROS. I have used 180 in the past but tend to only buy 150 now. You might start there and maybe in a smaller quantity and go from your own preferences.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I generally always stock 100, 150, 180, 220, 320. I might have some 80 too. You will probably find you use more 100 and 150 than the others. The 100 or 150 are usually your first grit used, and you must do a good job with those before moving on to higher grits. If you do a good job with that first grit, running up through the other grits goes really fast.
Sanding tip: Use sandpaper like it was free. Consider hypnosis.
-- ******** Bill Pounds http://www.billpounds.com

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I usta do that when I was the GM for a 3M Distributor. I got free rolls of 250 count paper quite often. Still working on some of those rolls years later and oddly this PSA paper still sticks like it was new w/o protective backing stuck to each sheet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

usable grades in my shop. I use 80 and 60 grades on Sticky pads, they do not go anywhere, you can not change the pad and reuse again.

And you can get sometimes asorted grades from 80 to 220 Max
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

120 and 220, I think see the most use.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mostly what I use are a 100 grit, followed by a 150 or 180 and then a 220. I have some 60 grit that I use when I screw something up like a butt joint when making a wider board. That is getting to be less of an occurrance now. I would say that I use 100 grit about 2 to one over the others.
Also, I recently started buying the Norton 3x brand of disks. WOW what a difference. They cut fast and last a long time.
Wayne

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I recently got a 50-pack assortment from amazon: 10-each of 80,100,120,150, and 220.
It's a great starting point to figure out what you will use. $16 is a good price IMHO.
I have been generally pleased with their longevity
Mirka 23-615-AP 5" 8 Hole Dustless Hook and Loop Assortment Pack Sandpaper
(Amazon.com product link shortened)89820342/sr=1-11/ref=sr_1_11/104-0424757-7378333?v=glance&s=hi

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tombo wrote:

Personally I find that I use 220 most of the time.
I second the suggestion that you get a sampler. If you go to <http://www.woodworkingshop.com/ , pick "abrasive disks", pick the type ofdisk you need, and look at 50 packs you'll find that you can get 10 of each grit from 60-400 for about 40 bucks and shipping. If you're using a finish that tolerates stearate they also have stearated disks up to 1500 grit. Unfortunately they don't have a sampler of the very fine grits, at least not that I can find.
Suggestion--keep three packs of each grit you use on hand (if you're a production shop I know you'll be keeping a lot more than this--I'm making a suggestion for someone with a home shop) and when you use one up, order another immediately. That way you're never in the position of using that last disk well past its useful life because it's the only one you've got and you've always got at least one full pack on hand.

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.