Sanding Disc for Table saw


I've been reading Ken Burton's book: Table Saw Tips & Tricks. He talks about a 10" sanding disc that you install in place of your blade so you can use your table saw as a disc sander. He said the disc had a tapered edge on one side so that you could use it also as an egde sander/jointer. Does anyone know where I can buy one of these discs? I've looked for an e-mail contact for Ken Burton but so far no luck. Thanks for your help!
Greg
--
Matisse


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Woodcraft for one, Sears used to have them but don't know about them anymore. RM~
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I used the Sears version for years. Worked fine.
RonB
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Is that the one with the grit embedded in a metal surface or one with a paper disk attached? I have the former, and many years of use from both dad and myself.
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wrote:

Me too. Used it waaaaaaay back and found it absolutely functional albeit dusty as ol' heck. I thought it was very clever. Funny thing is..I went to a 6" Delta jointer because I felt that chips were easier to manage than dust. This was well before DC's were as common as they are now in small shops.
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Freud makes one:
http://freud-tools.com/frcd10caands.html
but I'd be afraid of what extended use of it on my tablesaw would do to my bearings. Plus, tablesaw is typically 4000 rpm, disc sander usually around half that. Remember the guy that wanted to use his router as a spindle sander?

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Woodworker's supply has one - woodworker.com or http://woodworker.com/cgi-bin/FULLPRES.exe?PARTNUM -430
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Or router as kitchen aid? Should have kept it, it was a keeper!
On Fri, 12 Aug 2005 06:56:08 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.net wrote:

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Hear here! I think using table saws and drill presses for things that force side loads is asking for long range trouble. We pay good money for the precision of these machines.
Bob
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will do. If you;re applying much of a side load, you are either using worn out paper or the wrong grit. Mine eats through most anything with little or no pressure. The only problem I've had is that the paper is buckling from extremes in temperatures.
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Matisse,
Others have told you where to buy one. I made one. It's not for precision work but it does a great job of cleaning up small surfaces and breaking edges.
I made a 9 inch disk out of 3/4" plywood and bored a 5/8" thru hole in the center. The 3/4" thickness was too much to clear my arbor length so I had to rout a 5/8 wide by 1/4 deep dado in the back surface so I could slip it on.
Using a 9" diameter lets you cut sanding disks from ordinary sheets of sandpaper. At first I rubber-cemented the sandpaper to the plywood but found out later that it wasn't necessary. I merely clamp the paper to the plywood disk using the arbor nut and washer. I suppose, if needed, you could use a fender washer to get more clamping area.
It works good for me. The only downside is that there is no insert in the table top so I need to take care that nothing gets caught there.
Bill Leonhardt
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I just want to thank all of you for your input. Greatly appreciated.
While we're on the topic of Table Saws both Ken Burton and Kelly Mehler talk about replacing the stock pullys on the contractor saw with machined pulleys (as well as using a link belt in leiu of the V-belt...what a huge difference that made by the way) I've done a search on google but can't seem to find anything about where to get such an item. Is this strictly a custom order or is someone manufacturing machine replacement pullys specifically for Delta Contractor Saws?
Again, thanks for all your help.
Greg
--
Matisse


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You can get them from Woodcraft (www.woodcraft.com)
Matisse wrote:

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Also, http://www.in-lineindustries.com/products.html has them. I changed out mine on a 50-60somthing vintage Craftsman and seemed to work well. I'm not sure it is a lot different but I needed a belt and they worked with me to adjust the blade speed to what is considered proper speed. It was an easy switch once I got the correct pully sizes. First set had wrong bore but they fixed it with an email. This is the same ones Woodcraft sells they just don't have the alternate bore pully sizes. - Good luck.

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On Thu, 11 Aug 2005 17:42:50 -0600, Matisse wrote

I use my old 8" Craftsman saw as a disc sander (when it's not set up as a wet tile saw 8^)
I just spray glued sandpaper to an old non-carbide fine tooth plywood blade. Works like a charm.
-Bruce
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This is a good reason to find a garage sale Shopsmith. Variable speed, movable plate, variable angle on the table, comes with the sanding plate from the factory.
NOT sufficient reason to buy one new.
Patriarch
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