Rust prevention in the workshop

This time of year I need let the cars back into my workshop/garage. My table saw and jointer and other equipment get rolled to the side and covered, except on weekends. What do you suggest I use to try and prevent rust from moisture condensation? I was hoping to find something that would not cause streaking of stain, if oil gets transferred to wood that I will then pass through the machines. Also I don't like to use wax that has to be laboriously scraped off. Any ideas? I read about leaving a little oil in an old tuna can, to evaporate and condense on the steel. With our climate, the cars bring in snow on the tires, and puddles of water sit on the shop floor for hours.
Dave
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Dave asks:

Wax is usually it. I use Boeshield T9 most of the time, but with a recent table saw I made my own wax, harder than Johnson's even, and power buffed the top using a cordless buffer. It has surprised me. It is still slick. Still has the original shine.
You do not need to remove a properly done wax job on cast iron surfaces. But you cannot just apply a single coat and walk away. Whether you use floor wax (make sure it is NOT the anti-slip kind) or Boeshield or another, you have to buff. And I prefer three coats to one.
Charlie Self "Man is the only animal that blushes. Or needs to." Mark Twain
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What do you suggest I use to try and prevent

Boeshield T-9 or Top Cote, available at all good woodworking supply stores and Lee Valley. Repeat every month or so to be sure.
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WOOD magazine for March 2004 (Issue 154) pg. 87 has an article on rust removal and prevention. They also recommend the Boeshield products.
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Dave,
Others have mentioned what the products of choice are for rust prevention of the work areas. Don't forget to spray and/or apply the stuff to the bottom edges and underneath parts that are unfinished and subject to moisture also. For places that are not work surfaces, I uses an industrial Teflon spray ($6/can) that is used for coating chains and metal surfaces against salt water. With the garage floor being wet and if in the northeast, salt usually is part of the mix so everyday - squeegee the floor.
Bob S.
Another item is the cover you place over the equipment. Don't use plastic or any other material that can't breathe. I purchased some heavy cotton drop cloths from HD a couple of years back and cut them to the size need. You can also purchase equipment covers.

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Dave wrote:

Wax doesn't have to be scraped off if you apply and buff it correctly.
I've said lotsa times, and will say once more, my anti-rust system is Johnson's paste wax in combination with a cheap box fan aimed in the general direction of the most rustables. I forget where this idea came from originally, but I finally tried it, and hoo boy does it work great. So far my new aircraft carrier sized hunk o' cast iron still looks just like it did when I got the last of the cosmoline off of it about a year ago. My chisels and sundry other rustables are all nearly perfect too, though I did get a few dots of rust cropping up on the underside of two plane irons, and one frog. Presumably where the wax had worn through and the air wasn't moving fast enough to discourage condensation.
The shop is small, not climate controlled, and the door is often leaky in rain, which is comparable to your tire drippage scenario.
Assuming you can actually purchase a fan in Kanukistan of course. :)
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On Tue, 14 Dec 2004 07:41:21 GMT, "Dave"

Place a 3W light bulb under the table. The slightly higher temperature will keep moisture away. You could also dust the top with chalk (calcium carbonate).
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