Routers - reverse rotation?

Are there commercially available hand-held routers that run backwards from the normal direction? Or, does anyone know of a site that explains how to reverse the running direction of an existing router - say a PC690? Thanks.
JP
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On Sat, 1 Mar 2008 04:46:09 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Why? The cutting edge will face the wrong way.
Shapers are reversible, but shaper cutters can be installed in the correct cutting direction based on shaft rotation. The only router bit that I can think of where it's possible to reverse the cut direction is a slot cutter.
If you've got a cool idea based on a reversed router, I'd love to hear about it!
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Many (most?) routers use universal AC/DC motors, so simply reversing the field and armature connections (with respect to each other) should make it spin in the opposite direction. Reversing the leads to the brushes would be one way.
I STRONGLY recommend against trying it, though, as you'd have the colette tightening in the wrong direction, and its attachment screw also threaded the wrong way. Instead of tending to work tighter, it would tend to work looser. I do my utmost to avoid having sharp things come loose while spinning at high speeds.

Quite true, at least in the general case. I was assuming the original poster had some strange backwards bits lying around.
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wrote:

That's what I was looking for...

...and that's an excellent argument against doing so. At this time I haven't been able to find left-handed bearing-guided bits, although I could use the available LH straight cutters with a collar. I can get these from Whiteside et al. This would eliminate the bearing screw issue, but not the collet.
JP
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On Mar 1, 8:31 am, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

Some left-hand bits are available, and I'm sure they can be custom made in about any profile.

There are certain applications where it would be nice to not have to worry about blow-out when template routing. Specifically, cutting the left and right door jamb to fit an angled sill. We use one-piece jambs, with the stops rabbeted in, and it's a bit time consuming to clamp backer blocks to the potential blow-out areas. My thinking was that I could start the cut with a right hand bit, and come in from the other side with a left hand bit.
JP
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ISTR that shapers can be run in reverse and the typical shaper cutter can be turned upside down to reverse the direction in which it cuts.
That would allow one to cut mirror image profiles with the same cutter, though of course you can do the same thing by flipping the workpiece upside down.
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wrote:

Some left-hand bits are available, and I'm sure they can be custom made in about any profile.

There are certain applications where it would be nice to not have to worry about blow-out when template routing. Specifically, cutting the left and right door jamb to fit an angled sill. We use one-piece jambs, with the stops rabbeted in, and it's a bit time consuming to clamp backer blocks to the potential blow-out areas. My thinking was that I could start the cut with a right hand bit, and come in from the other side with a left hand bit.
Spiral?
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On Sun, 2 Mar 2008 08:10:43 -0800 (PST), Jay Pique

What about the bits with bearings on both ends?
Switch from top to bottom pattern in seconds.
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On Mar 2, 5:42 pm, "Bonehenge (B A R R Y)"

That's definitely an option. It just seems like it'd be so nice to be able to set up your template once, clamp your workpiece once, and just grab the router you need at the time. Especially for larger pieces. Now it's a mission to find one!
JP
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Jay Pique wrote:

On that note, you could also equip one router with a top bearing and the other with a bottom. You'd still have to unclamp, but you have to switch routers anyway.
Clamping can be made faster with holdfasts, wedges, or quick clamps.
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Sat, Mar 1, 2008, 4:46am (EST-3) snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com doth query: Are there commercially available hand-held routers that run backwards from the normal direction? Or, does anyone know of a site that explains how to reverse the running direction of an existing router - say a PC690?
First, why would you ask? You in a backward country or sumpthing?
JOAT 10 Out Of 10 Terrorists Prefer Hillary For President - Bumper Sticker I do not have a problem with a woman president - except for Hillary.
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On Mar 2, 3:23 pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

JP ******************* Forward?
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I'd be leary of reversing the direction of an existing router. I believe the collet would loosen if the shaft turned opposite the normal direction.
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