router bit doesn't match the router hole by thousandths..

Hi guys,
I bought my first router, a Makita 3606, and my first bits, a stright and a "V" shaped one. I've never had touch a router before so the first I realized was the coupling of the router bit to the router was very tight for the stright bit. I had not to force the bit to get into the router, but it had no movement inside, without closing the nut. "Ok, this is not a drill, it is a high speed machine, everything should be exact match" -I though. But when tested the "V" shaped bit, it doesn't fit into the router. It's also a 1/4'', I checked, but it looks like only by thousandths it doesn't fit. I returned back to the store and I was lucky, I could replace the bit. But now I afraid May be is it the makita router too narrow? Will I find the same problem again and agai when buying bits? Is it any method for the router bits the get "softened" (I mean using oil, polisher or something else) such a way to allow the bit get into the router?
Thanks in advance Faustino
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such
Your bits should fit snugly in the router collette before its tightened, but not require forcing or oil or polishing. Be sure the locking nut is backed off all the way before you try to insert the bit. A router collette has got two "stages" for loosening. It could be that the collette is partially engaged when you try to insert the bit.
If loosening the nut doesn't help, then I think you have an out of tolerance collette and should return the router for a new one.
Bob
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tolerance
I trust more on the router than on the bits. From reading here Makita is a good router maker. The stright bit is from Irwin. Made in China but it is sold under the USA mark "American Tool". And that Irwin bit fits perfectly. The bits that doesn't fits is sold without any commercial brand...
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On Fri, 19 Nov 2004 08:28:26 -0600, "Faustino Dina"

Watch out for 6mm metric bits. They look like 1/4", but they're 1/3rd of a mm too small and they won't clamp safely in a 1/4" router collet.
Alternatively, check you don't have a 6mm router collet and a 1/4" bits.
Personally I throw 6mm bits away. Too much risk of mixing them.
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Actually the bit doesn't fits. I got a replacement of the same unbranded kind of bit and it fits better

Router is Makita 3606 1HP 1/4" collet. This problematic bit is being sold without any brand. The stright bit branded "Irwin/American Tool" fits perfectly. Whom trust? I think best to trust Makita...
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Faustino Dina wrote:

It is best to trust nobody and to measure instead. The collets are replaceable throwaway items on most routers--if you don't want to exchange the router then get a new collet.
I've so far never encountered a router bit that physically wouldn't fit in the collet on the router as long as the nominal size for the bit shank and the collet were the same.
--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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In addition to the other advice, some collet nuts will be loose but still not open enough to accept a bit. This is true on a lot of self extracting collets. Try loosening the collet 2 or 3 more turns. You may find that the nut gets tighter to turn "again" while loosening and then start turning freely again.
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the
I opened the collet full to the end. Inside is a ring, conic shaped on the external surface, cilindric on the internal, with a longitudinal cut to allow the bit get pressed by the collet. I hope not to damage anything...
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[...]

"a" longitudinal cut? Dou you really mean that there is only one slit? Good ones have three slits, heap ones have four (because thats much easier to make) and expensive large ones have many. But only one cannot be good because with one there is no way to kep the bit centered.
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Do not rule out a bad collet either. My new Bosch 6 years ago would not let go of the bit. The collet was in my hand with the bit and it was not letting go. The dealer exchanged the collet nut and all was well.
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WE had a similar problem with our Omnijig cutting box joints. Some would fit and others wouldn't. The guide bushing was not concentric with the bit and when we used the exact same approach it would work, when we rotated the router it wouldn't. I use a dial indicator on the base or the router to check it. max

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