repairing/restoring rotted plywood


I have a truck camper that is over 30 years old. Some of the plywood in this camper is weather checked and/or rotted. It's 3/4 inch plywood, and I don't know if it's "treated" or not.
The wood is dry.
The rotted areas are exposed to the sun sometimes.
I am soon going to sand the surface of this plywood.
What product or products would work for me to brush on this wood? I want to stop further deterioration, and also give some strength to the rotted areas. I'm not too concerned with the cosmetics of this plywood after this operation, but _AM_ concerned about giving or restoring some structural strength to it.
Replacing the plywood is NOT an option.
Thank you....... Lee Carkenord
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Why is replacing the plywood NOT an option? That's really your best route. You could apply a coat of fiberglass over the bad areas, making sure to reach out on to good wood. Apply it per the directions and paint when done.
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>I have a truck camper that is over 30 years old. Some of the plywood >in this camper is weather checked and/or rotted. It's 3/4 inch >plywood, and I don't know if it's "treated" or not. > >The wood is dry. > >The rotted areas are exposed to the sun sometimes. > >I am soon going to sand the surface of this plywood. > >What product or products would work for me to brush on this wood? I >want to stop further deterioration, and also give some strength to the >rotted areas. I'm not too concerned with the cosmetics of this plywood >after this operation, but _AM_ concerned about giving or restoring >some structural strength to it. > > Replacing the plywood is NOT an option.
Then you have no option.
Once dry rot has set in, the only option is replacement.
Lew
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wrote:

Well, if he glasses over the affected area he can achieve a repair of sorts. Not as good a plan as replacing the wood by any means, but a decent glass job will effectively seal the wood against air and moisture - to the point that the wood is only subject to its normal rate of absorption in the surrounding areas. The glass will span an area with suitable structural strength, but that span is obviously dependent upon a couple of factors. The OP never mentioned the size of the affected area so it's hard to suggest just how well a glass repair would really work.
I know that if it were me, I'd replace the wood. It's going to be less work in the end than doing a proper glass job. For some reason he feels replacing the wood is out of the question. Not sure I understand that.
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Mike Marlow wrote:
> Well, if he glasses over the affected area he can achieve a repair of sorts.
Not really.
You have no chance at all with polyester, woven roving and mat.
You might get some benefit using epoxy and double bias knitted glass but not much.
Either of the above is moot if the cost of replacement 3/4" ply is a problem.
Either of the above will cost 2-5 times the cost of ply.
Lew
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Then, with respect, you're pooched.
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snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

Oh, you're looking for Miracle Wood Repair. When you find some let me know - I've been looking for it forever.
R
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The formula: 2 parts Miracle Whip 1 part catalytic hardener
<snicker>
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Yeahbut, how big are the parts?
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On Thu, 23 Mar 2006 21:33:35 -0500, Mike Marlow wrote:

Ones about 'so big' and the other is about half 'so big'. Use 4 of the half 'so big' parts to one of the 'so big' parts and you're all set.
Sheesh ... don't they teach anything in school anymore?
;-)
Bill
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snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

Gluvit or similar. Not cheap and (like all epoxies) needs to be painted to protect it from UV light. http://www.marinetex.com/PRODUCT%20PAGE_files/All%20Gluvit/Gluvit%20faq . htm ________________

How much strength you could get with just Gluvit depends on a lot of vartiables...mostly, how big the area is, if it is rotted through and what kind of structural strength you want. If you are talking about smallish areas and just want to plug them up, Bondo.
--
dadiOH
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snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

encounter. Please take it off, cut some fire wood, trash the rest and buy a new one. I have seen one come off and read about others. Water damage and termites will kill you.     eeeeek,     jo4hn
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On 22 Mar 2006 11:39:21 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

You might try a product such as Minwax Wood Hardener, then filling and glassing as noted in previuos posts.
HTH Bill
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