Repair advise on roof framing

I know this woodworking group is probably not oriented to rough framing capentry but I figure I have all the "wood" expert here and I really need some expert advise.
I am repairing a house that had some termite and rot problems over the year. The house has been tented and roof has been replaced last year by the previous owner.
Now I am repairing some areas of the fascia and underlying lumber. It's probably easier to show a few pictures.
Here is one side where I removed the soffit ceiling to expose the soffit framing.
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/courtyard/CopyofP1010074.jpg
Before I removed the soffit I thought the damaged piece is a short section from the exterior wall to the fascia, but turned out it goes all the way inside so I cannot replace it. The ends are basically rotted away and had termite damage as well. The fascia is a 2x12 that will be attached to it perpendicularly. I guess the only way to repair this, is to attach a 2x6 like I had to one side? or should I attach another one to the other side and "sandwich" the damaged piece? What is the best way to repair this?
Another damaged area is shown here from an angle:
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/courtyard/CopyofP1010079.jpg
a side view of the same damaged area:
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/courtyard/P1010075.jpg
a close up with annotations:
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/courtyard/CopyofP1010081.jpg
In the above image, you can see the rafter extends to the fascia (which I already removed) and the end of the rafter is completely rotted. Again it extends all the way to the inside of the roof and it's impossible to replace, so my solution is to use an attached 2x4, well, I will now change it to a 3x8 to match it exactly.
Note the rafter is attached to another fascia. This is a 2x12. There is a metal I-beam that runs across the ceiling, the 2x12 is seated inside the I beam so that another layer of fascia can be attached to it. See how the termite had eaten half the wood away? I was thinking about cutting that piece out but with the I beam in the way I cannot cut it and replace that section, then I thought it is best to not cut it to preserve whatever strength it has. My question is - is there a way to strengthen it? I know since the I-beam carries the roof load this 2x12 is not truly structural, but I will have another layer of fascia covering it, and then some parts of it will be attached to a gutter, and some parts of it will be attached to an overhead screen enclosure framework, so it will have to be able to handle that.
My question is whether there is any product I can use to "fill" this hole that will have some structural strength? Is there any kind of structural wood filler? Anything at all that may help?
After I repair all the pieces, should I tie the 2x12 and the adjacent rafter together using some metal straps would that make things better?
Thanks,
MC
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hate to tell you this, but the right thing to do is replace all the damaged wood. it should have been done as part of the roof replacement. it'll be a lot harder to do, but not impossible from below. filler is for looks only.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wood
Wood
Wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

year.
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/courtyard/CopyofP1010074.jpg
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/courtyard/CopyofP1010079.jpg
http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w67/143house/courtyard/CopyofP1010081.jpg
a
know
of
an
rafter
While you have the area open, you might want to consult with the termite company that did the inspection upon sale. It looks to my eye as the damage was not so much a termite problem but rather a poorly designed roof that allowed moisture to seep in and deteriorate the wood.
Sistering new rafter stubs is a common method of repair, and you should have no further problems as long as the new roofing job was a good one.
If you have rafters that have been structurally damaged by rot, this should be addressed sooner rather than later. If you wait for the rafter to fail you could loose your roof.
--
Roger Shoaf
If you are not part of the solution, you are not dissolved in the solvent.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.