Removing *some of* the paint from a wooden door, smoothing the surface for new paint

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On Tue, 17 May 2016 11:38:26 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

Just tacking on
H2O is often referred to as the universal solvent.
Just about anything will dissolve into water with time, now the fact is that it can take eons for some materials to dissolve at normal temps. But on geological time frames it is.
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On Tue, 17 May 2016 11:38:26 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

contracts and the paint cracks at the joint. Now the polyester filler is exposed to water at the joint. it soaks up water and expands, coming loose from the wood. It dries and shrinks, leavibg a gap. it gets wet again abd the wood gets wet - and soon you have the mess that was under that bondo - even if there was half decent prep done.
Just like using polyester body filler on a car without sealing the repair welds - or worse yet using it to fill rustouts. It won't last - period. Seal it with an epoxy based fiberglass patch and it will last almost forever. Polyester resin and fibergkass is a lot better than that talc filled body-filler crap, but even that breaks down.(and sometimes pretty quickly)
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On Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 9:10:14 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sigh... Note that NOWHERE in any post that I have made in this thread did I advocate, advise, suggest, or imply that using resin to seal a crack in the joinery of a door was a viable solution. You are arguing with yourself at this point.
Robert
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On Tue, 17 May 2016 21:44:05 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

pieces of wood met, and the paint chipped off back from the crack.
No indication from the OP that there was any wood damage. A bit of high quality caulk in the seam would work much better than Bondo for his repair. It is flexible.
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On Wednesday, May 18, 2016 at 12:10:12 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I am beginning to think you don't read any of the posts. It's OK, I partic ipate in another forum where most of the members read the first sentence, s ometimes two, and that's all they read.
I like your "new" thoughts, although... they sure sound familiar.
On Monday, May 16, 2016 at 11:41:58 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

possible with a tool, then smooth it a bit with a wet paper towel.

racks will come back, but if the raw edges are sealed up with caulk it will slow down the process quite a bit. I use caulk on the joinery because doo rs always flex at the joints. Maybe not a lot, but always, and with all th at I have repaired that is almost always "the scene of the crime". Rock Ha rd will break apart after a while due to this flexing and it offers no prot ection to the surface it is attached to. It isn't made to do that; it is a filler.
That was from two days ago.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Got a citation?
Polyester resin doesn't pass water. Talc - the primary other - component is about the least permeable mineral around; plus, it is encapsulated in the resin.
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On Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 5:19:44 PM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

If you are asking me, you are asking the wrong guy. I was replying to this:
On Tuesday, May 17, 2016 at 11:47:32 AM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It was his information. I have read enough on the subject of polyester resins (not the topic at hand, BTW) to not speak without practical, hands on experience.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

No, not you, sorry, it was meant for snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca
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wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Your experience with polyester resin differs with mine. It also differs with that of numerous companies that use it for commercial water proofing. It also differs with that of the manufacturers who say it is water proof.
As to Bondo, it's water absorption is in the order of 0.3%. Water resistant enough for me, especially after painting :)
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca says...

So your experience is that water leaks through your body repairs? Glad I don't get my car fixed at _your_ shop.
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On Sat, 21 May 2016 10:58:27 -0400, "J. Clarke"

Generally use fiberglass re-enforced epoxy over any rust repair or brazed patch and just enough filler to smooth it out because the fiberglass is hard to fine-finish. Guys who punch holes in the rusty metal and fill with Bondo WILL have the bondo pop., as will those who "stitch" in a metal patch and cover with Bondo.
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wrote:

even vinyl-ester? resin stands up better than poyester resin ( Like the old Uniroyal Vibrin)
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On 5/17/2016 11:45 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote: Snip\

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Unless you have a couple cans of Flex-Seal!
Puckdropper
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On 18 May 2016 02:30:28 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

They are selling it by the gallon now, stock up!
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wrote:

Right, because you never know when you'll want to seal up a screen door on a submarine!
Puckdropper
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wrote:

the Hurricanes hit - - -
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote in

Wood exterior doors are not code approved in Florida (in locations where the hurricane code applies).
John
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snipped-for-privacy@ix.netcom.com says...

Yeah, I've heard that wood frame construction isn't approved either. I don't know where you people get this stuff. Next you're going to say that glass windows aren't allowed.
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