Recommended furniture dimensions - Armoire

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On 2/20/2015 9:35 AM, Greg Guarino wrote:

I couldn't locate this other reference on my disorganized bookshelves the first time round: "Rodale's Illustrated Cabinetmaking" by Bill Hylton. He gives these dimensions for a generic armoire, wardrobe, schrank: 84" X 22" X 51.5". but this height includes a tallish curved cornice. The schrank is about the same size except for a 71" width. He discusses various permutations of drawers/shelves/hanging as well as a few different styles.
I think I'd still try googling for dimensions and pictures unless you can get to a furniture store which has what you want so you can measure and photograph an example to emulate.
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wrote:

I think the height should be tall enough you do not see the dust on top.
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24"

40" is enough for the clothes, a 1 1/2" high rod (I make my own) and sufficient space above the rod to get hangers on and off.
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dadiOH
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email.me:

Way back when I was a draftsman doing house plans, I was told to never make a closet narrower than 16" because otherwise the hangers wouldn't hang straight. Usually we aimed for 20-22".
John
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On Friday, February 20, 2015 at 9:35:27 AM UTC-5, Greg Guarino wrote:

Attached are pictures of the Armoire in my daughters' room. This unit was i nherited from my wife's grandmother about 35 years ago. We suspect that it is of German origin, from the early 1900's, but we are not sure. The wife and I used it for a few years and then it was "given" to the 2 girls for th eir clothes. (Actually, we switched rooms and left it behind because it is too big for the room we moved into)
The overall dimensions are 77" high x 89" long x 26" deep. Yes, it's a very big unit. (more on that later) It was originally designed with a hanging c loset on both ends and an adjustable shelf section in the middle. I modifie d it by lowering the hanging rod and adding an extra shelf as shown in this picture.
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/Slide1_zps048d847e.jpg
As far as the dimensions you were asking about, the top of the hanging rod is 34" from the floor of the Armoire. This was high enough for the girl's c lothes when they were young, but adult size shirts touch the floor. (I've u sed a height of 38" in some closets and that works fine for my shirts, but I'm only 5'4".) The outside depth of the unit is 26", but the inside depth is 23". That is more than enough depth for hanging shirts, pants, etc.
The original hanging rod on the opposite side (not shown) is 59" from the f loor of the Armoire. That's 7" lower than the rods in my standard closets. The shelves in the end sections are 10" from the ceiling of the Armoire.
The Armoire is big, in fact way too big to move as a single unit. However, it is a cleverly designed knock-down unit. The following picture shows 2 fe atures:
1 - The notched brackets and cleats used for the adjustable shelves in the center section.
2 - One of the knock-down connectors that connect the walls to the top and bottom of the unit. By inserting a thin rod, such as a Allen wrench, into t he hole in the barrel, you can screw it down (or up) to take the unit apart . When completely dismantled, you end up with 12 flat pieces, the largest of which are the top and the bottom. Oh yeah...and 8 shelves. The doors ar e attached with piano hinges using 56 flat screws per hinge.
http://i440.photobucket.com/albums/qq121/DerbyDad03/Slide2_zps30d5b0d6.jpg
If you need any more dimensions or other information, don't hesitate to ask .
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On Friday, February 20, 2015 at 4:04:02 PM UTC-6, DerbyDad03 wrote:

That notched design dates back to, at least, the 1820s. Here's 2 pics of a 1820s china hutch that has a similar notched (adjustable) shelf bracing. Cabinet: https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/16409673160/ (and how about those recently upholstered dining chairs!!!) Bracing: https://www.flickr.com/photos/43836144@N04/16409535770/
Just so happens, I plan to use this bracing technique on/in the gun cabinet, i.e., being able to (easily) remove the 2 gun rack aspects and install adjustable shelves. I happen to have just enough of those old boards, remaining, to make 3 shelves.
Sonny
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On Fri, 20 Feb 2015 09:35:25 -0500

dunno but would check those pro closet sites and see what dimensions they show use

I saw one once that had the hangers hanging at an angle so the depth was less than a full-hanger width. it had room on the gaps for a shelf for briefs and socks
the hangers on the left hung one way and the hangers on the right hung opposite with two gaps one left one right there was also a tie rack in the middle gap
but it was missing the sock/brief warming accoutrement
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