Rechargable batteries

Page 2 of 3  
wrote:

Yes. No sensible person wants more hanging on his hand or belt than necessary; if a 14.4 will do the job, an 18 or 24 doesn't make sense.

Money. The tools cost more; replacement batteries cost way more than I paid for my first car.

the woodworking magazines did a report on cordless tools, and the writer said the only thing missing was a battery-powered router. I took one look at that 19.2 and never even asked for one to try out. It looked as if it had to be horribly top heavy, not a great condition for a router.
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Personally I dont think the drive for the bigger tools is coming from mfrs. wanting to increase their gross sales dollars. Just because a tool costs more doesnt mean the mfr makes more GP which is their ultimate goal. Of course an item could be sold at a much lower GP than desired but volume would offset the lower GP I dont think that is the case for high voltage tools.
I think the high voltage cordless tools are driven by the tim the toolman mindset though it may be fading. This is the same mindset that drives the SUV, Hummer, 4 Dr, 4WD, Dually, Diesel, craze. Its just what you see in all the ad's. A big strapping stud, with leather work gloves, with a 2 9/16" selffeed chucked up in a cordless no less, punching through a couple 2x's. Big, leafy chips flying in slow motion, a grimmacing face barely able to control the overwhelming power of the tool. One of the most common ad's I see is a Dewalt cordless boring a hole that no tradesman would ever consistantly drill with a cordless. It would be like a plumber punching 20 studs for a 2" line with a cordless. Thats a job where you get out the Holehawg and make some money, not grab the cordless.
My feeling is it consumer driven thought it may be a little late,
Mark
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On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 12:34:49 -0800 (PST), Charlie Self

Unless the 24 uses "A" sized cells instead of "C" sized. Higher voltage and lower current CAN have limitted advantages.Voltage does not necessarilly mean more weight - and the opposite CAN occur.

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On Wed, 27 Feb 2008 17:19:32 GMT, FrozenNorth

I have' one!
A 12v powered DeWalt charger. <G>
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my primary drills are 12v and 14.4v, I agree that unless you are drilling 1/2" holes in steel or masonry all day or running lags nonstop with an impact the 18v drills are more of a tim the tool man thing than most realize. I am more than happy to lug 1/3 the payload all day and have a tool half the size in trade for an extra battery change.
most of our cordless use is driving and small holes (1/2" and under) in wood. Anything other than that and the cord comes out. The 12 and 14v impacts are perfect for us.
Mark
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news:fdb564c9-27f1-4b0c-a93a-
most of our cordless use is driving and small holes (1/2" and under) in wood. Anything other than that and the cord comes out. The 12 and 14v impacts are perfect for us.
Mark
I used 9.6 volt for yeeeeears...Well, actually when Panasonic came out with the first 9.6 and 12 volt drills. I only recently stopped up to 12 volt because the 9.6 batteries were getting hard to find.
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"Charlie Self" wrote

LOL ... I've got a <gasp> 3.6 volt Black & Decker "PivotDriver" that I always grab for quickie cabinet "hardware" jobs, like mounting slides on the sides of drawers, or under drawer hardware for those snap-in undermount drawer slides ... did just that to 22 drawers in a kitchen in new construction just this morning.
This little "Harry Homeowner" grade tool will drive a couple hundred 7/16" screws into maple drawer sides on one "versapack" charge, weighs less than 10 oz, and when the power runs out on the last drawer, can be used as a screwdriver in a pinch ... AAMOF, that is a handy feature because I can drive a screw most of the way home on the battery, then torque it down just right, by hand, without removing the bit from the screw ... gotta love it for that.
Sheeesssh ... never thought I'd be bragging on a B&D product! ;)
But, if I could find a better cordless screwdriver, this same handy size and with a more powerful battery, I'd buy it in a New York minute.
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"Swingman" wrote

I used to be an electronic technician and worked with many techies, both electronic and engineering. Almost all of them had a small, rechargable screwdriver like the one you mentioned. It was just the thing for getting into the guts of a metal box. And they would be used to reassemble the box after the repair was made. It really speeded up the process.
I also used them when taking equipment in and out of 19" racks. I hear in the old days, they used to use the venerable yankee screwdriver for these tasks. You don't really want anything bigger than the absolute minimum size for these tasks.
Another rechargable goodie in the modern techies toolbox is the portable soldering iron.
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"Lee Michaels" wrote

AAMOF, down through the years I've got up a specific toolbox for almost every job/interest, and this particular tool was indeed purchased for my "computer toolbox" back in the days when I built and maintained all the servers/workstations in our little internet company.
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A good friend is building an airplane with a 7.2 Makita. Battery went south years ago, and he had it wired to a 12 volt lead acid battery with lampcord. Worked good, but for 1/8" drills in aluminum the speed was still a bit slow. He hooked 2 batteries in series, and the 7.2 is merrily ponchin' 'oles on 24 volts. Every couple evenings he just hooks the batteries in parallel on the automatic 12 volt charger and he's ready to go for another few days
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<clare at snyder.on.ca> wrote in message wrote:

No doubt. I once tried to burn out an automotive window regulator motor, I hooked 6, 12 automotive batteries to the thing and it only ran faster. I never could get it to fail. I would not be surprised it the motors in all the drills are the same and only geared differently to get the speed and or power.
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"Leon" wrote:

Once worked for a company that built small motors (window, wiper, etc) for the auto industry.
Standard test for a window motor was to lock the rotor, close the switch on a fully charged battery and see what would happen.
If the motor did not survive to run again, it was considered as a failed unit.
Lew
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On Thu, 28 Feb 2008 07:29:14 -0600, "Leon"

and never fail. But it seems that all the regulator designs have some other weak link. Sometimes it is a plastic gear rack, or a cable or some plastic bracket or cable slide that fail after a couple of years of use. The manufacturers have all gone to servicing only the full assembly at a couple hundred bucks minimum because a 30 cent part has failed.
Frank, who has a shed full of perfectly good motors on defective power window regulators, waiting for one of those motors to actually fail. Maybe I can convert them to power drivers.........
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Yeah, and especially frustrating to a service manager that had to listen to the complaints. Up until the late 70's the windo regulator motor on GM cars was in direct contact with the window regulator. It engaged an arcked piece of steel with teeth on it. Then the bright idea was to complicate the set up and add a flimsy track guide and made the track out of plastic, that plastic track of course engaged a small plastic gear in the regulator motor. I think they got the idea from the similar power antenna design.

;~)
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I think Bosch's little L-O 10 volt is probably better, but someone swiped mine before I could find out.
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I was just about to ask if anyone had any experience(s) with that very driver. I am tired of lugging the Makita 18v NiMH though it must be four years old now and still on the same two batteries. And, as someone already noted, there are frequent cabinet installation situations where its size is a limiting factor. - Dave in Houston
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I have the Idrive and carry it on my belt most all the time when I am doing interior work. It is very handy as I am always trying to reduce the impact of repetetive actions on the body (trying to prolong the pain/arthritis free portion of life). I do this right down to turning a screwdriver. When we are trimming out electric we always use offset screwdrivers for the speed and redced impact on your wrists. This is why I carry the I drive though not for electric. I most always carry a phillips in my belt and while the Idrive is about a zillion times heavier than a screwdriver, for the amount of times I use it the bit of extra weight is offset by the wrist fatigue it saves.
My $0.02 on the Idrive I would have to say #1 it is heavy. I ordered it from our lumberyard and when it landed I was surprised how heavy it was. I carry it in a Quikdrive screw pouch. As a side note, this pouch came with a quickdrive screwgun we have and the pouch is absolutely awesome. I carry wonderbars, catspaws, the I drive, hammer tackers, and all sorts of long tools you dont want hanging out of a loop (or wont hang). Its a great little pouch. Anyway, other than the weight I like the Idrive a lot. The head is very compact, I will say you have to have a very "positive" bit especially for phillips because without exerting a lot of force inline with the screw (typical of offset screwdrivers) they will jump and cam out a lot. I dont use the clutch too often as I have never found a clutch, mechanical or electronic, that would accommodate real world materials. They always over/under drive. I mostly leave the Idrive on the last two or drill settings. I cant honestly say that the Idrive would drive 100's of 7/16 screws into hardwood though I have never tried. We just finished a hard maple kitchen and installing doors and slides the Idrive got a workout with hinge/slide screws using truss head cutting tip screws. I have become an impact junkie so perhaps I am spoiled by their speed and power.
What I will say, is the Bosch 10v Impactor is an impressive tool. Truley tiny, power, you can stuff it in your jeans front pocket if needed. They both have their place, and both are pricey (150 or less for the I drive and close to 200 for the impactor) but I think they are a snapshot of the future. Power in a very small package.
Mark
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So I'm cruising the tool isle at COSCO tonight and LOOKEE THERE! A genuine Skil Model 2410 10.8 Lithium Ion drill/driver - and ONLY $29.99 which is $40 less that Le Grande Orange: http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId051&productId0487671&langId=-1&catalogId053&ci_src110944&ci_sku0487671&cm_mmc=1hd.com2froogle-_-product_feed-_-D25X-_-100487671
Lemmethinkaboutit-I'lltakeit. How can you go wrong? I guess the Bosch will have to wait till I burn this one up - maybe sooner than I think?
Dave in Houston
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And I thought >> I << had an Oprah moment when I admitted I had a Craftsman tool I liked. !!
Black and Decker? You're a bold man to air that around here, that's no doubt! ;^)
I'll go one more on you.
I have a HF Central Machinery cordless screwdriver that cost me all of $6 on one of their blowout sales. It works like a champ, and since it doesn't develop 350 lbs of torque, it is perfect for installing pulls, adjusting and installing hardware, etc.
Also great for electric plug and switch trim plates, and just about any kind of predrilled hole/small screw driving. Its drive base is a 1/4" standard, so you can drill little holes if you have the bits with the drive shanks handy.
I don't know how many screws it will actually drive as I have never had it run down when using it. It takes something like 6-8 hours to charge, so a little planning is needed when you are going to use it. I am sure I made up my investment on the first job.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

That's the thing about HF--a lot of their stuff is so cheap that if you buy and find out that it's crap then you still got a fair price just for the information that it's crap. And quite a lot of it works quite well.
I mean you'd pay a good chunk of that six bucks for a magazine with a review of cordless screwdrivers.
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