Re: What's On Your Grinder?



Norton grinding wheels.
i
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On 2 Oct 2006 17:21:41 -0700, "Too_Many_Tools"

===============Given the abuse/misuse that most shop grinders get, consider installing some belt sanders, possibly with the dobbie-pad belts installed.
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Let me know what you want to do with wire wheels.
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I am going to shop for a stainless wire wheel. I have a 1/2 hp motor and want to mount various wheels to it (wire, buffer, flap, diamond) using arbor adapters. One i want to buy is a wire wheel, maybe 8"
i

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1/2 hp is kinda' wimpy for an 8" wheel. Why Stainless? You only use Stainless brushes on stainless workpieces. Consider a pulley driven arbor and get the speed up to 4k or so with two 6" carbon steel wheels made of .012" wire, stacked-up. One trick is to stack-up a .012" and a .008" wheel. Lean the piece to the coarse to clean and to the fine to polish. http://www.ohiobrush.com/
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Timely message. Just today, I picked up a 1/6 hp motor from Lee Valley to connect via a pulley to a grinder I've had sitting here for a number of years.
Is there a general speed that one would run a grinder? Would I be wiser to attach a pulley with a number of steps on it? I expect to be mostly sharpening knives and such, maybe a few chisels or perhaps some drill bits.
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Upscale wrote:

What is the speed of the motor? What is the max speed of your grinding wheel? Does the 'grinder' have an adequate guard? Do you know how to calculate speed output using different pulleys? These questions MUST be answered before you proceed.
Ken.
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My sharpening book recomends 600 rpm. Feet per minute would have been better but it looked like a 6" wheel. Too high a speed and you'll burn the temper out of your knives. Karl
Ken Davey wrote:

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On Mon, 02 Oct 2006 23:33:27 -0700, Ken Davey wrote:

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Ken, I volunteer also for rosetta@home protein folding research. Have ablmost 4,000 units completed.
Still no t-shirt :-(
Bill
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General purpose bench grinders usually run at standard induction motor speeds. 3600 rpm (actual speed usually listed as 3450 or there about) for grinders up to 8", and 1800 (again, actual 1725 or 1750 rpm) for 10" & larger wheels.
There are also low speed grinders that use the 1800 rpm motor for the 8" and smaller wheels. These are better for sharpening since they don't get the workpiece as hot, but naturally much slower at removing metal and rough grinding. These slow speed grinders are best used with wheels designed for them rather than the general purpose wheels used on the standard speed grinders.
I wouldn't try anything bigger than a 6" wheel with a 1/6hp motor.
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Upscale wrote:

I hope it's not too late to return that motor. 1/6 hp is WAY too small to run a grinder. What will happen is that the motor will bog down when you try to remove more than the smallest amount of material. For instance, sharpening a lawn mower blade would be totally impractical. 1/6 hp might be OK for sharpening kitchen knives, but not for removing material. Removing material (shaping) is a very useful function for a grinder, you should build yours with that in mind.
HTH, Bob
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wrote:

I have a 1/5 HP grinder, which I can only use for deburring.
i
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"Bob Engelhardt" wrote in message

Ok, thanks for the information. What minimum hp would you recommend considering that I'd be using the grinder mostly for sharpening purposes and other what I'd consider to be light duty uses?
I wouldn't have any problem returning the 1/6 hp motor, but the price was right and I'm wondering what things I could use it for?
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you can use it for sharpening small things, deburring, minor beveling. I would keep the little one and also get a bigger one. You can look for one in a used market. I am happy with a 1/5 HP (in my basement) and a 1/2 HP (in my garage) grinders. 1/5 HP is useful to remove metal around holes after drilling, etc.
i
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Upscale wrote:
> Ok, thanks for the information. What minimum hp would you recommend > considering that I'd be using the grinder mostly for sharpening purposes and > other what I'd consider to be light duty uses?
1/2HP, 1750 RPM, minimum.
> I wouldn't have any problem returning the 1/6 hp motor, but the price was > right and I'm wondering what things I could use it for?
Some kind of a fan or other air handling device.
Lew
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Upscale wrote:

...
1. Don't limit your perspective by what you would be using it for now. A grinder can be used more than you'd expect and you should build it with a lot "head room" (room for expansion of your uses).
2. A wire wheel is useful on a grinder, but you tend to lean into it more and you do need power for that.
3. I have 2 grinders, each is 1/3 hp. I could use more sometimes, but 1/3 hp is generally OK.
Bob
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On Sat, 07 Oct 2006 11:55:20 -0400, Bob Engelhardt

Ive three grinders bench mounted. An old Tombstone Craftsman, 1/3hp, with a soft wheel on one side and a fine wire on the other, a 1 hp 10" with a big rough wheel on one side and a course wide knotted wheel on the other, and a 1/2 hp Souix with a white wheel on one side and a pink on the other for roughing tooling. Or I use one of the 3 mounted belt sanders....
Gunner
"A prudent man foresees the difficulties ahead and prepares for them; the simpleton goes blindly on and suffers the consequences." - Proverbs 22:3
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On 2 Oct 2006 17:21:41 -0700, "Too_Many_Tools"

The wheels that came with it, because they came with it, and I haven't wore them off yet. I know a lot of guys like the friable stone wheels for sharpening, but you learn to have a light touch fairly quickly if you use the standard wheels.
In a wood shop, I'd skip the wire wheels. They throw off little bits of wire that can mess up a freshly sanded surface real quick. Great in a garage or shed, though.
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I turn, so I have an 80 grit aluminum oxide on the left for sharpening and a 50 carborundum (which came with the grinder) on the right for rough shaping. I replaced the tables with workable ones and put a jig on the left. One of the things I notice in a lot of shops is the lack of cleaning of grinding wheels. Get a wheel dresser and use when the wheels glaze. It makes a lot of difference. My set up is on my web page under sharpening. ______ God bless and safe turning Darrell Feltmate Truro, NS, Canada www.aroundthewoods.com

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