Re: What is it? LI

It was somewhere outside Barstow when "Lane" <lane (no spam) at copperaccents dot com> wrote:

A "Friend". This one's actually a "Flexible Friend", because it has a cable body, not a rigid body. May be a rip-off copy, as many of them are.
287 Bed key ?
288 Photographer's lightmeter
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It was somewhere outside Barstow when snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:

Interesting - we didn't have these in the UK (AFAIK).
Our approach for playing second-hand ex-jukebox singles (for new singles don't need any adapter) was different. We put a little plastic adaptor clip into each record.
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    This one was for a "record changer" -- a turntable with extra features which allowed you to stack some number of records and it would automatically drop the lowest of the stack at the top onto the turntable (or previous records) at the bottom. Obviously, the mechanism for lifting and retracting the arm had to lift it fairly high to deal with the most extreme stack of records.
    These typically had the skinny spindle with a crook near the top through which a clip was actuated from below through the spindle. When used with 45 RPM records (which were sold to individuals in stores in the US, instead of just for juke boxes), this adaptor was slid down over the skinny spindle. and the clip at the crook actuated the support keys seen at about the 1/3 distance from the top. Prior to drawing those black supports (one visible and one 180 degrees around the adaptor), it first extends some thin metal pieces just above (just barely visible as a glint in the photo above the black part) to separate the bottom-most record from those above. I then would withdraw the black part, dropping the bottom-most record, and then re-extend it and withdraw the metal pieces, allowing the stack to settle down so the bottom-most record was supported by the black piece again.
    Note that I *know* that some changers were made in the UK back around 1957, as I remember the Garrard changers were advertised in the same flyer as the plain turntables.
    Note, also, that teens tended to have changers made *only* for 45-RPM records, so the fat spindle was built in, and the whole thing was smaller and easier to take to a party along with a box of the records.
    I believe that the first of the 45RPM record players had a slot in the front, and you just pushed it in -- somewhat similar to some CD players today. I never saw one of those in person, though I have seen photos of them.
    Yes -- the clips were available in the US -- and often used with turntables -- but they did not come already in the records. Instead, you bought a pack of five or ten at a time. Most that I remember were yellow, though I think that I also remember a light blue version.
    Also -- there were adaptors intended to be left on the turntable, a plastic puck with (sometimes) a shallow conical top to ease dropping the record onto it without having to fiddle to get it centered. I've seen these (with a sheet of felt) glued to an oversized record platter (usually the kind used to send out multiple advertising spots to radio stations). The actual turntable also would have a felt top (instead of the more common moulded rubber one), so the record could slip on it. This was used for "slip queuing" -- you placed the needle in the run-in groove, allowed it to play until you heard the first note, gripped the edge of the platter, and pulled it backwards about 1/8 of a turn. (This while the sound from that turntable was only fed to the monitor speakers in the broadcast room, not to the air. When the time came, you would bring the volume up to the air feed, talk as much as was deemed necessary, and then let go of the record edge with the turntable still spinning under it, thus giving a quick and sure start to the record's playing. (There were broadcast turntables which could start much more quickly, and with these, the record was placed on, spun forward by hand until the sound, then backed up just enough so when you switched the turntable motor on, it would be up to speed just as it hit the first note.
    Slip queuing was better suited to the hectic pace common to disk jockeys who would typically play 45 RPM records and have teen audiences, while the other style was better suited to those who played classical or jazz recordings.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
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Somehow the server lost my original post so I'll reply here to everyone's initial answers.
These have all been correctly identified:
284. Rock climber's camming device 286. Elevator door key. Thanks to Gary for contributing this photo. 287. Wing nut wrench 288. Light meter 289. 45-RPM spindle adapter
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285. Several people get partial credit, it's a flying wing made of polystyrene. The answer that I'm looking for is the specific name of this glider. The reason that I include it here is that it flies in a very unusual manner, it isn't thrown like most small planes, and it can be kept aloft indefinitely, with no strings or other attachments. I'll post the answer in a day or two if no one gets it.
Rob
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Here is the answer to number 285:
This flying wing is called a Walkalong Glider, it can be kept aloft and maneuvered by the air that flows around your body as you walk forward. The easiest way to fly it is to use a piece of cardboard, positioned perpendicular to the ground and held a foot or more in front of the body. As you walk, the localized upcurrent from the cardboard keeps the glider flying and controls its direction. The plane is positioned with the two blue dots a few inches directly over the cardboard.
The next step is to use just your hands to create the updraft, and when you master this way of flying it, you can try the even more difficult technique of keeping the glider aloft by using the air flowing off just your head.
I first saw this glider on the Scientific American Frontiers pbs program, and sent away for one the next day. You can see a video of the glider flying at the site below, it's the fourth one from the top:
http://www.pbs.org/saf/1109/video/watchonline.htm
Rob
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