Re: Thickening stain

I wouldn't add poly - if you need to re-stain to intensify the color you will have sealed the wood (the main reason I don't use polyshades.) Just curious - why would you want to thicken the stain? The purpose of stain is to penetrate deep into the wood. Thicker would involve pigments remaining on the surface.
Jums

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Dear Sam,

Veloutine?
Thanks,
David.
Every neighbourhood has one, in mine, I'm him.
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On Thu, 28 Aug 2003 13:57:02 GMT, "David F. Eisan"

Izzat Franch, mon sewer?
Yeah, people uthing thtain thickenth me, too.
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I'm trying to match a color of a dining room set I have. I've been able to almost duplicate it with about 4 coats of bombay mahogany polyshade and then putting on a thick layer of stain. The stain I was using is by zar but it's a milk chocolate brown (looks to be their darkest) and I need a dark chocolate brown/almost black. I have minwax jacobean which looks about the right shade. The zar is thicker than the minwax jacobean and goes on well to reproduce what I was looking for, just not dark enough. When I look at the furniture I'm trying to duplicate it looks like they put down one layer of medium brown stain and a layer of some type of either VERY dark red on top or a red and then very dark brown. You can't see the wood grain at all (though you can see the texture). It's like they painted it with 10 coats of various colored polyshade and it's streaky. It looks dark brown at some angles but then dark red at other angles, I'm assuming because of the streaks. From standard distance from the table it's that dark brown Asian color (it's an Asian style table with bamboo inserts).
So I guess I am trying to turn the minwax into a glaze.
Sam

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I seem to recall Jeff Jewitt having something to "gel" a stain. www.homesteadfinishing.com has search capabilities and an excellent forum.
On Thu, 28 Aug 2003 10:28:12 -0400, "Sam Hopkins"

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Take 1 teaspoon of cornstarch. Dissolve it into 1/4 cup of water. For some reason, it must be cold water and not hot water. Stir until mixed thoroughly. Now mix the solution in stirring constantly..
I'm not sure if it will work with Minwax but it does wonders with beef stew.
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ROTFLMAO! Isn't that the new Minwax Gravy series?
Jums

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It worked, thanks.
Sam

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LOL! But is it any good with biscuits? :-)

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