Re: Help finding old router part


Jon Wrote: > I've got an older (10-15 years?) Craftsman router model 315.17380 and

I have need of the same part as you Jon. Did you or anyone else have success in finding it?
Thanks, Jerry
--
Jerry S


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If you bring this broken part to any good machine shop you should be able to have it made special for you for a reasonable amount of money.
Doug

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Define reasonable. My shop rate is $80.00 per hour, one hour minimum. No offense intended but many people seem to think that machine shops work for near nothing.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Many think the same of woodworkers... 8^(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
True. Mass production has brought the price of things down so far that a realistic charge for a one off item seems totally outrages.
wrote:

for
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Schultz Wrote: > If you bring this broken part to any good machine shop you should be > able to

> and

> line,

Jon and others in need of this part or other parts: There is another possible solution. I had the part made at my local vocational school. It was made in steel with just a slight modification relative to the original part. Their practice is to charge $7 to $10 an hour (I forget the exact amount) if the work is extensive; otherwise, the part is made without expense to you. They and you both win ; they get a project and you get your replacement part. The practicality of the approach depends upon the proximity of your vocational school.
It should be noted that this was not my idea, but suggested by another gentlemen from Kentucky.
--
Jerry S


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
That works fine for those that can find a place like that. Trouble is, most of these schools (in WA at least) get government funding so they can not do outside work. The private schools can do so.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do you have the specification of the thread and the nut size? Will anything stock from a supply house work? Take a look at McMaster or a place that specializes in fasteners.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jerry S wrote: <snip>

As an alternative, if this is the collet nut you refer to, you might look into replacing it with a "QuickRout" bit connector, also sold through Sears. Then you'll have quick bit replacement capacity to boot.
H
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hylourgos Wrote:

Folks - thanks for your suggestions. My son, also, suggested having the part made. However, the cost implies that one must be really attached to this commercial grade router to invest in making a new part. One can purchase new Craftsman routers between $60 to $100 or more with easier to use features today. Regardless of my final solution to the part need, I have another challenge: how to remove the bit that is currently in the collet. Any suggestions?
--
Jerry S

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
For removing rusted stuff, I'll put a Liquid Wrench type of lube on it once or twice a day for 3 or so days, then attack it. Tapping sometimes helps, as does the application of heat (Careful not to catch the lube on fire. A heat gun is better here than a torch). You might even get a long-reach socket to fit--then you could use an impact driver, that'd get it easy. As long as you didn't install the bit all the way into the collet in the first place, you can use a hunk of wood to beat it down once you loosen the collet (if the bit is rusted in place).
Just some ideas, H.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hylourgos Wrote: > For removing rusted stuff, I'll put a Liquid Wrench type of lube on it

> sometimes

> the

Thanks for the suggestions. I finally removed the bit with an impact technique - hammer and wrench. The parts were gummed not rusted.
--
Jerry S


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
hylourgos Wrote: > Jerry S wrote:

> boot.

A great idea! I almost bought one. However, upon examination, the "QuickRout" connector does not appear to fit my router. Although it is claimed to fit all Craftsman routers (comes in 1/4" & 1/2" bit shaft sizes), this is apparently not true for the very old ones. These connectors are collets intended to fit tightly over smooth shafts. Mine is a larger diameter one with threads.
Has anyone used this connector successfully on this model number router?
--
Jerry S


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.