Re: Best Cordless Impact Wrench Kit ever!!!

On 23 Feb 2005 12:46:50 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@ladiesofletters.com wrote:

==============I have no clue...? I am a woodworker BUT I also rebuilt/restore Old Cars or whatever you want to call it as another hobby...and I have a lot of uses for impact wrenches.. Just can not figure out WHERE I would need a cordless one...
Bob Griffiths
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I have a corded impact wrench that gets some good use, but I would not need a cordless model. On the other hand, a cordless impact driver is great for driving/removing deck screws without stripping out the head. I use the Makita 14.4V.
On Thu, 24 Feb 2005 12:56:29 -0500, Bob G.

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Just curious as why a cordless impact driver would be better at removing deck screws than, say, a regular cordless drill/driver?
I may be missing something.
Ray
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Have you ever used an air or electric impact wrench doing mechanical work? Same principal. The rapid "hammering" action does the work of tightening or loosening the fastener without transferring the torque to your wrist. If your deck screws are only say, 1 1/2 or 2", you might not really notice it unless they were "seized" in the wood. However, if you're talking 3 1/2 or 4", it's going to take a lot of torque to move them. With a regular drill/driver, ALL that torque is transferred back to your wrist. With the cordless impact, you don't feel that torque. It also, due to the rapid hammering action, doesn't "cam" the driver bit out of the screwhead like a regular driver does.
--
Nahmie
Those on the cutting edge bleed a lot.
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thx.
I am gonna get one of those.
ray
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On 26 Feb 2005 18:53:33 -0800, Ray snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
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Well, just bear this in mind. The fact that the thing hammers has a huge effect on the real usability. For screws etc, this will not be so critical. But if you are thinking of replacing your socket set and a 4' cheater bar, for those really tough bolts, you need a really serious rattle gun. I have one that is rated at 400 lb ft. It does NOT act like a 100lb force on a 4' bar when there's a tough nut to crack. I can easily tighten a nut more than that thing can.
I have to admit that it's air powered, and I am using only 3/8" airline. 1/2" would be better, or even 3/4". But be aware of the actual energy that the machine delivers. It applies a lot of force, but over a very short distance and for a very short time at each hit.

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On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 13:15:23 +0800, the inscrutable OldNick

But aren't you using 1/4" nipples to feed it, as we do up here on the top side of the world?
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On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 07:20:17 -0800, Larry Jaques
......and in reply I say!:
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We are talking air units here?...oh sorry.
Yes. I am. But the trouble caused by 5 metres of 3/8" air hose over 5 metres of 1/2" air hose is far more than the trouble caused by a very short restriction at the ends.
Cordin to me and my little calculators
at 100 PSI in and 20 CFM 1/4" diameter hole 1" long = .6 PSI drop 3/8" diam hose 15' long = 10 PSI drop 1/2" diam hose 15' long = 2 PSI drop
So IIAC, we have 3.2 PSI vs 11.2 PSI drop over the two lines.
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vaguely proposed a theory

But, what about the drop in air volume?
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On Tue, 1 Mar 2005 22:22:00 -0500, "Mike Marlow"
......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email ???????????

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On Wed, 02 Mar 2005 08:21:12 +0800, the inscrutable OldNick

What are you running that consumes 20 CFM?!? Most shop compressors are sub 10 CFM up here.
I've never seen it put like that, Nick. We usually talk in cfm. And a 1/4" orifice is large enough to pass 48.7 cfm at 40psi and 108 cfm at 100 psi.
Air discharge through 100' of hose is 16 cfm at 90psi for 1/4" and 76 cfm at 90psi for 1/2". So, 1/4" hose and nipples are sufficient for full flow of most tools at nominal psi. 1/2" is a waste of money while 3/8" is the common hose size around here at $10-25 for a 50' length. All these from charts in Lee Valley's Handyman In Your Pocket reference book.
I do see the need for rubber hose now that I have some of the HF poly hoses. Egad, these things don't like to roll or unroll at ALL! -- Remember: Every silver lining has a cloud. ---- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
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"Larry Jaques" wrote

BRAVO Larry ... BRAVO (You may take your bow now).
A wonderful example of information ... related to the question at hand ... that clarifies the situation, and not confusing it!
The next person that says that explainations such as this (real math) is too difficult is hereby renamed "Barbie"! (or at least gets the "Ken" equipment modification).
Rick
[ cue crowd going crazy ]
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On Wed, 02 Mar 2005 16:58:17 -0800, Larry Jaques
......and in reply I say!:
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A 400 lb-ft rattle gun. An Air blower which is actually a cheap sand blaster with no input tube. It really boosts the airflow. A cheapo ROS that I now don't bother with.

I thought I was talking in CFM. That orifice will pass that flow, but will cause a pressure drop. But the orifices are not the problem. maybe we are talking at cross purposes here. I said my line was too small and you asked if I was using 1/4" nipples. I assumed you thought the nipples were making the larger line a waste of time. My point was that if the larger line is added to the small nipples the gain from the line is significant.

But all of them will cause pressure loss, as I described. 100' of 1/4" line would _waste_ 16 cfm. There would be a trickle at the other end, according to me.
http://www.airheads.net/tech/techinfo/airline.html
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 11:25:03 +0800, the inscrutable OldNick

OK, if you're using a 30cfm compressor and related tools, you will need a larger line, hose, and nipples. The rest of the world doesn't. Your tools are the very few exceptions.
Want a fast air gun? Put a couple a male and female coupler together. When you plug it into the hose, hold on! The painter I used to work with used one of those to clean/dry cars before spraying.

I suppose the actual airflow is the difference. Most tools on the market use far less than 10cfm so the size of the hose and nipple is moot.

My point was that most everyday tools would never see that since they don't use anywhere near that much airflow.
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 09:02:54 -0800, Larry Jaques
......and in reply I say!:
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I am not sure what is happening here.
You could _NOT_ use 1/4" hose to run 16 CFM over 100', to get 90 PSI delivery to a working tool. It does not matter what I am using.
Also, many tools on the market _claim_ to use less than 10 CFM. There are two factors here. One is sheer BS, the other os the fact that they are allowed to use "multi point average" consumption figures. These assume that the use is actually intermittent, although with many in use in a shop, they average out to the claimed usage if you divide the total use by the number of tools. It's also BS, but more complicated.
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On Fri, 04 Mar 2005 09:47:18 +0800, the inscrutable OldNick

In looking closer at that chart, it states a 90psi inlet pressure. It doesn't state what the outlet pressure is, just the flow. But almost nobody makes a 1/4" 100' hose, either. Anywho, a 1/4" hose will drop 16cfm. How's that? ;)

Just like Searz Horsepower, eh? <g>
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On Thu, 03 Mar 2005 19:47:18 -0800, Larry Jaques

friction.
'zzackly.
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or
Yabbut, we're all *Real* men with wrists the thickness of tree trunks. No one will admit to needing the hammering capability of an impact wrench or drill. A cordless impact wrench won't get us any women and those us with wives already know that we might get lucky again if she sees us struggling with 4" deck bolts. So, be a man, don't buy any impact equipment and get the woman of your dreams. :) . . . .... upscale whose wrists are so sore that he's having trouble picking up the phone to make an appointment to see the physiotherapist.
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Hmmm, I thought impact wrenches were the macho vibrator. ;)
ray
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