Re: bandaids! (topical for sure)

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James, you must have some kind of greasy or silicone based sweat.. ;~) I don't have that problem unless I am sweaty to start with. Hell, most the time the cut has already scabbed over before I notice that I have been cut. My wife points my cuts out to me..
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Anybody tried the new "spray-on" bandages? I've seen a few television ads where a simple spray can is used to apply a transparent bandage barrier coating for minor cuts. I was wondering how effective it was?
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I remember using those when I was a kid..... They burned like fire.

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How good do they work......always getting them kid bandaids that aren,t man-size...

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Well as a kid, I was never really impressed... But then I was kid and the application burned like fire.. Now that was ummm 37 years ago and I was always getting skinned up knees. My mother would spray it on my knee and I would grit my teeth, squeeze the hell out of my pillow and hold my breath until I just about popped.
Then I could slowly begin breathing again after a minute or so.... but then I had to hold my leg real still until the bandage dried. 15-20 minutes IIRC. If not, my pants would stick to the liquid bandage, which would pull of any scab that began to form....
Having forgotten just how badly this all felt during application, 4 years ago my son skinned his knee. I thought... Liquid bandade,,, I sprayed it on him and it was Dejavu....I saw what I must have looked like... He and I pitched the stuff in the trash.
It did work though..
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I haven't tried the spray on bandages but was introduced to a liquid bandage back in 1986 that is called "New Skin." It forms a film over the wound, is antiseptic, and stays put during further abuse. Following is how I found out about "New Skin."
The period of January to April 1986 I spent riding a bicycle all over the state of FL and then meandered my way north to upstate NY. By the time I hit Charlotte NC I was having problems with saddle sores. I laid over in the Charlotte area for nearly a week trying to get healed up. I also bought silicone cream for my butt, got a gel filled saddle cover. I then rode to Williamsburg VA. I was hurting again and spent a week there "visiting"--one of the reasons I got the job in the Gunsmith Shop. ;-)
While in Williamsburg I went into a Treasure drug store on Jamestown Rd and spoke to the pharmacist about my problem. After he composed himself he told me about rope burns in Army boot camp and walked me over to New Skin. I would have tried anything at that point so I bought it and headed right to my campsite. Into the tent I went... laying on my sleeping bag with my legs up in the air and my shorts around my ankles I painted my butt with New Skin. It burned like hell! After a bit I pulled up by shorts and got out of the tent. A short time later I noticed that my underwear was kind of stuck to my butt. Stuck was an understatement... it was GLUED to my butt! I went back in the tent and peeled my underwear off my butt which REALLY lit my butt up! I painted more New Skin on, waited a long time and testing for dryness frequently and finally got dressed again. In the long run New Skin did save my ass but in the short run it exacerbated an already bad problem. ;-)
When I went back to Williamsburg to work at the end of May I took the opportunity to stop in and tell the pharmacist that he saved my ass. He in turn told me that it was the first time in his many years on the job that ANYONE had ever come back and thanked him. He probably tells his version of the story too as he was clearly struck by the experience.
John ...still using New Skin... cautiously. ;-)
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John Grossbohlin wrote:

That was good, but not as good as I thought it was going to be. I have a much more gruesome bicycle story. :)
I could have used some of that stuff last year. My son got his first bike, and we were riding around in the big parking lot across the street from my house.
I was coming up to pass him, and I said something like "passing on your left" to him. So he turned hard left, without looking. I T-boned him. Neither one of us was wearing any kind of safety gear, and I was going somewhere around 15 mph.
Boy I tell you what, there's nothing like watching asphalt go by half an inch from your eyes while your forehead shreds itself and your knees and elbows are being turned into raw meat, and there's not a damn thing you can do but wait for it to stop.
Now we look like attack dog trainers when we go riding. Can't have enough protection. :)
Oh, and I use the J&J flexy things. Especially the knuckle versions. I'm always grinding or sanding off my knuckles, and I find it takes forever for them to heal if I don't do something to stop them from cracking and oozing every time I turn around.
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On Sat, 12 Jul 2003 21:48:32 -0400, "John Grossbohlin"

Collodion. Good stuff, and unlike cyano it's flexible. Not so good for cuts, but better for large surface problems.
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It also stings like hell, unlike any bandaid I've ever used.
John Emmons
wrote:

bandage
is
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On Sun, 13 Jul 2003 17:11:54 GMT, "John Emmons"
Judging by its contents, it's no wonder that it stings.

While I'd heard the word before, I never knew precisely what it was and had to look it up. To wit:
collodion (ku-lO'dE-un)
n. 1. A highly flammable syrupy solution of pyroxylin, ether, and alcohol, used especially as an adhesive to close small wounds and for making photographic plates.
[From New Latin collodium from Greek kollOdEs glutinous, gluelike kolla glue -oeidEs -oid]
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it does sting and it des not hold up. super glue is a better choice and it dries faster. it usually does not hurt either.
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wrote:

No, I use superglue.
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Andy,
I'd rethink this. Back in the late 70's I recall reading a couple of papers published in "Science" reporting on the use of cyanoacrylates used to repair fractures in long bones incurred by US troops in the Vietnam War. This was experimental at the time. The conclusion was that a nasty bone cancer, osteosarcoma was pretty well linked to the use of cyanoacrylates.
Admittedly bone is not skin but I still avoid super glue in skin wounds.
I believe that today's surgical glues, while close to super glue, are not chemically identical.
Phil
Andy Dingley wrote:

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http://www.aafp.org/afp/20000301/1383.html
Superglue, by any other name, would stick as sweet.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

Super glue cure via methyl alcohol, which is essentially toxic. Dermabond uses octyl esters for the same purpose. So, strictly speaking, I suppose the cyanoacrylate is identical, the curing agent mixed with it is not. So you would be correct.
That probably also explains why Super Glue burns so badly in cuts (yes, I've tried it).
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On Sat, 12 Jul 2003 20:06:31 GMT, "Mortimer Schnerd, RN"
Some don't. A few years ago I was working in a homeless shelter, when one of the residents (a quiet harmless guy) was glassed in the face. As is usual in Bristol, the hospital A&E people treated him like scum, just about stopped the bleeding (think workshop staple gun) and threw him out as fast as possible.
I spend two hours that night, almost certainly completely contrary to our insurance, cleaning up the cuts properly and suturing (sic) each one with superglue (presumably the butyl cyanoacrylate, because I've never seen the dermabond version used outside medicine). And a few months later, it healed with what I have to regard as very pleasing results (for D-I-Y cosmetic surgery).
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<snip>
Bandaides? Arn't thoses some little thing for kids? Nothing a man would use!
Myx
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pixelated:

About 20 years ago I had to go see a doctor and he put on a nice little cloth bandaid. I've been buying them ever since, and the generic brands are every bit as good as the high-priced J&J type. The box I have in the cupboard now is Target brand flex fabric. They're wunnerful.
BTW, the new surgical glues and BandAid(tm) liquid glues are just watered down cyanoacrylate (super) glues in case you run out of fabric strips one day.
In a pinch, masking tape and TP work fine to keep the red bits off your wood.
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I too have found masking tape to be effective bandage adhesive. Seems to stop the red all by itself. It's also possible to get the darn stuff way too tight and get that tingly blue tipped feeling if'n yer not careful.
Dan
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    I also find band-aids worthless.
    I use a piece of gauze and electrical tape.
        Gool luck.
            Peter
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