? Rack for Sheets


For a shop, what's a good kind of storage system for odd pieces of sheet goods: plywood, particle board, paneling, etc.? In other words, what kind of rack would be a good system? I suppose we have about 20 linear feet of wall space to use, and we'll store along the wall in the rack arrangement.
--
(||) Nehmo (||)



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Well of course it depends on what you want to store. IF the dimensions of the sheet material is no longer than eight feet and no wider than five feet then a mobile rack(s) similar to what I built for myself should work well for you. My rack is eight feet long, 35 inches deep and 12 inches wide. It is open on both ends so material can be slid in from either end and if the material is not too wide it can also be loaded/unloaded from the top. It is on casters so one end can be pulled out from the wall for easier access. My space is limited so when working on a large project I roll the rack clear out of the shop. The floor is a couple of 2 x 6's the sides were made from 2 sheets of OSB. Would post a picture or two if anyone is interested. Earl Creel

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I'd be interested in seeing a picture.
Josh
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The best would be laying the panels flat.
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Agree flat storage is best for the material but flat storage requires a lot of floor space which is often just not available. Narrow vertical racks (that are usually full) keep material in a vertical position and bowing is not a problem. Earl Creel

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So how are you doing Earl?

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Okay for an old man. Found an additional source for salvage material. It is a Co. that builds roof and floor trusses. They generate huge amounts of 2 x 4 cut-offs. They have pointy ends and are not very long, after the point is trimmed off, but long enough to make drawers and such. Some are good enough that I can re-saw them down and get book matched material that is over 5/8" thick. After a few passes through the old Kuster drum sander I have good looking stock that is a strong 9/16" which is the thickness I like to use for most drawer boxes. Projects like this keep me as busy as I want to be. Earl Creel
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Great. Sounds like a nice find. Sounds like they might make good cabinet door panels or small boxes also.
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Earl Creel wrote: . They have pointy ends and are not very long, after the

Cover your ears and close your eyes, pointy stick fans. :o) Sam
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For those left over pieces I have mine stored flat in a rack above my garage door. There was nothing in that space and it is not in the way.
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I store my plywood on edge in the corner of my shop. I built a stud wall about 2 feet from the side wall, then stand my plywood sheets on end between the two walls (I have 9-1/2' ceilings). They rest on PT 2x6's laid flat on the floor to keep the edges off the concrete.
This system only takes up about 2'x4' of floor space, and I can easily flip though the various sheets to find the one I need. Then it's easy to take a single sheet out without moving the others.
I have several sheets of material, so everything is held vertically. And, I don't usually have full sheets around very long to worry about warping.
I have a wheeled cart I store in front of the plywood sheets, so the space doesn't go to waste. When I need a sheet of plywood, I simply wheel out the cart, then pull out the sheet I need.
I've been real happy with this system.
Anthony
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http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/PlyStorage.html
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Charlie,

Hey, that's an EXCELLENT variation of what I built. I may have to disassemble my stud wall and build something similar. It looks a much better option for the smaller pieces of plywood.
Thanks for posting that!
Anthony
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If you have a truck and at least one able-bodied buddy, take a trip to your local Borg and round up one of the stray buggies some inconsiderate yahoo left in the parking lot.
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On Sat, 21 Jan 2006 05:18:04 -0500, JKevorkian

Don't forget to rent the Load N' Go so it'll be easier to get home!
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- JKevorkian -

- Nehmo - Since it has wheels, I don't need a buddy. I could just tie a rope between one and the trailer hich. Then drive home.
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(||) Nehmo (||)


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