QUESTION - 10" Mater Saw Cut Width

I may be needing a power miter saw, so doing homework. For straight cuts, 1/2" to 3/4" thick material, max of 8" wide, so don't need fancy. I could use my saw sled, but a miter saw'd be faster, and handier - I'd be cutting a lot of 'em.
Checked the Delta site, and they claim their non-slider, compound miter saw, 10" blade, will make a 11 1/2" cut. Carbide-tipped, 10" diameter X 40T ATB saw blade included as standard equipment.<snip> • Cuts 11 1/2" at 90° and 8" at 45° miter; 3 5/8" depth of cut at 90° and 2" at 45° bevel.
Just below that, claims the same.
Blade Diameter • 10" <snip> BLADE • Diameter: 10"(254 mm) • Arbor: 5/8"(16 mm) • Speed: 5000 rpm CAPACITY • Cut-off at 90°: 11 1/2"(292 mm) • Cut-off at 45° miter: 8"(203 mm
I haven't gotten back with Delta, to ask them. Haven't decided yet, don't know if I could trust their answer.
I can see a 10" miter saw cutting "close" to a 10" cut, but not more than that, unless it was a slider. I can also see you'd probably have to have a spacer under the piece you were cutting, before you would get to the max width cut. Maybe around 8.5" - 9"? But, wider than the blade? I don't see it.
I've been checking various sites, and geting varying answers, even for the same make and model. One, that sounds more realistic, gave a max width cut of 6 1/8" for a 8 1/4" blade - using a spacer under the material being cut. When I get the chance, and remember to take my tape measure, I'll be hitting a few stores, and see what I can find out on my own.
In the meantime, can anyone, that actually "owns" a 10" non-slider miter saw, tell me what the max width cut on their's is? Any make. Or 12", any make.
May just wind up making another saw sled, at this rate.
JOAT We will never have great leaders as long as we mistake education for intelligence, ambition for ability, and lack of transgression for integrity. - Unknown
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On Sat, 02 Oct 2004 00:29:20 -0400, J T wrote:

You're right, this doesn't pass the sniff test. I pawed around on Delta's site and I think you may have grabbed the stats for the Model 36-240, which is, indeed, a slider. Their 36-585 10" non-slider claims only a 5 5/8" crosscut. As a comparison, DeWally's 10" non-slider claims 6".
--
Joe Wells


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Sat, Oct 2, 2004, 12:46am (EDT-1) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Joe Wells) says: <snip> you may have grabbed the stats for the Model 36-240, which is,indeed, a slider. Their 36-585 10" non-slider claims only a 5 5/8" crosscut. As a comparison, DeWally's 10" non-slider claims 6".
Don't recall the model I looked at, but took care to pass up any that said slider. Which is why it seemed so strange.
Wonder what they would cut using a sacrificial riser block. I'd hade to have to go to a 12" - if that's the case, I think I'd pass, and just make a dedicaed saw sled.
JOAT We will never have great leaders as long as we mistake education for intelligence, ambition for ability, and lack of transgression for integrity. - Unknown
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A 10" blade on a non-slider, makes an 11 1/2" cut...
Huh.
We really do have to stop shipping Canadian pharmaceuticals south of the border... Both kinds...
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J T wrote:

of material on the lower, outside edge.
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A 10" non-slider makes about a 6" cut. If you use a spacer to elevate slightly above the table, you can get about 6-1/2". Yes, I just measured one. GerryG
On Sat, 2 Oct 2004 00:29:20 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (J T) wrote:

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