Q about Minwax Polyurethane

Hi All,
Long story short:
I'm just about done refinishing a stock on an old rifle. I got Minwax stain with matching Semi-Gloss topcoat. I stained it, and then put on a couple of coats of the semi-gloss. After letting it dry, I lightly sanded it with 400 grit paper to get rid of the raised grain. Everything's fine, but I just changed my mind and decided to give it a high gloss finish. I originally thought that multiple coats of semigloss would amount to pretty shiny finish, due to my previous experience with using acryllic gloss on plastic.
My question is this: Is it OK to do the final coats with Gloss finish, even though the previous coats are semi-gloss?
Thanks,
Igor.
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Oui.
--
Rumpty

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Yes it will be fine but take note that the clarity of the wood will not be as good as had you used gloss to start with. Generally you should always use the gloss finishes and follow with the last coat as a semi gloss if you want a satin or non gloss finish.

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I see. Luckily ther isn't that much poly on it yet. Just enough NOT to raise the grain again after light sanding.

You live - you learn :) The next one will be all gloss.
Thank You for your help, gentlemen...
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I don't use satin any longer as the sheen on gloss can be knocked down with abrasives and not obscure grain.
On 5 Apr 2004 12:05:34 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net (Igor) wrote:

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what Leon said. if you want glossy; start with glossy for max clarity. a coat or two of semi isn't gonna obscure much though. a bunch of coats of satin will, or heaven forbid, flat.
dave
Igor wrote:

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Igor wrote:

Treat it like a filler rather than a primer; cut it back to the bare wood. Subsequent coats should look a million miles deep with a glass-smooth surface. Resist temptation to build a heavy film. Deep always looks better than thick. Thin 50%, apply with a rag, four coats, max.
A card scraper or razor blade will cut the old finish faster than sandpaper, even on uncured poly, since it won't clog. A thin, flexible scraper is preferred, since it can conform to non-flat surfaces.
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surface.
thick.
My wife does alot of the finishing for me on my projects. It took me a long time to convince her of that very thing. Wipe it on, don't brush it. SH
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