PVC Pipe and a DC System

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Ha ha, good one! Can you cite just ONE "documented incident"
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Lawrence Wasserman wrote:

I'll sure be surprised if he can.
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Bob:
Do you have a photo of the underside of your seperator lid you made? My system is 5" pipe which requires building my own lid.
Alan
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As promised I posted some pictures in alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking.
Bob Davis Houston, Texas
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Bob,
Thanks for posting a photo of the required adapter piece. As a matter of fact, I have one of those and will get more when I start the PVC project. Oddly, the part you show in the picture has shoulders on each end for clamping hose or inserting into the PVC. However, the plastic Delta blast gate that I have seems to have tapered shoulders on both sides making them more difficult to firmly clamp hose or insert into the PVC. I just don't understand the design of the gates and how they're intended to be incorporated in a DC system. Even if one used just WW parts and hoses (never mind the PVC pipe), I can't understand why blast gates would have tapered connections on both ends.
Thanks again.

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Yeah, they are a pain to connect to anything.
I cut 8 slits in the S&D PVC pipe and then clamped it to the metal blast gate using a flat stainless hose clamp. It holds it very rigidly because the metal gate is a solid casting. I don't know how well this would work with the plastic gates.
Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com says...

piece of duct tape around it so the PVC has more to bite on. I also slit the PVC and use hose clamps. It ends up working pretty good.
-Later
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I have reduced the static problem to a virtual asset.
I have lined each section with copper wires , connected all the wires in series to a high speed rotational switch. the switch in turn is conected to an ac converter which is then connected to the dust collection main drive motor.
So what I have ended up with is a self powered dust collection system , in short a perpetual motion machine .As you can imagine my shop is absolutely spotless. At times when I am not using the DC system I just divert power to the household circuit breaker box . Since I discoved this phenomenon my whole local community has taken advantage of it and bought dustcollecton systems even though most don't have shops .
The only major problem so far is we have not found a way to turn the dam things off,so everyones lights are on 24 hours a day and frankly the noise of all these machines running night and day is driving us berserk...mjh
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A classic!

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One other thing , the build up of static electricity in the DC system ducting is primarilly due ductal friction. Although to some this is a disadvantage ,but in the depths of winter[when the temps fall to below 65 degrees in the south] , the ductional friction produces heat .
If correctly managed this can heat the operating space so that no additional shop heating is required . this has to carefully managed bearing in mind that the lighter woods such as pine and goncola alves are not the heat producers that lignum viti or perhaps cuban mahogany are ....mjh
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So this is what the death of a thread looks like.
Lou
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And no one used the N*zi word.
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I use the metal blastgates (woodcraft?). On the DC sied I silicone a two inch pvc pipe section on. This inserts into the (F) fitting on the tee joint or 90 degree joint. On the woodworking side it is easy to connect a 4 inch WW hose or a 4 inch metal dryer vent flex tube for spot collection such as my lathe.
TEF wrote:

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Two inch? Is that a typo? Why would you use a two inch pipe section in a 4 inch system? Doesn't that restrict it severely?
Bob
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On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 20:51:51 GMT, "Bob"

I think he meant two inch long, not diameter.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
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His poor wife...
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