Porter Cable router table arrgghh

I just started on my first _real_ project, and I figured I'd be able to use my Porter Cable router table and a 2" long straight-cut bit as a jointer. Maybe you know how this is done: the infeed fence is about 1/16" back from the bit, and the outfeed side of the fence is set at the bit's edge. And since the P-C table has a two=part fence, this is pretty easy.
Nope. As it turns out... well, the two metal brackets that hold the wooden fence pieces? That _look_ as though they hold them at 90 degrees to the plane of the table itself? Nahh. They're just a hair off of true vertical. So the mahogany I jointed was jointed at something like 89 degrees.
Grrr. I could probably fudge the project by that much (I'm not making a table top, after all). But still....
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I just gotta ask: don't you place the workpiece down on the table, so that an perpendicularity issue with the fence is moot? The lower edge of the fence generally should be EVER so slightly closer to the bit than the top edge (I'm talking a few thousandths), under ideal conditions, but it isn't that critical.
If you hold the wood vertically, then of course the fence needs to be as close to vertical as possible.
Dave
Brian Siano wrote:

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David wrote:

Once the board reaches the second fence, I start pushing the board against it. That way, it travels on a straight line past the bit. (It functions as the outfeed area on a real jointer. Imagine if that outfeed area was just a tad out of level with the blades.)
The amount by which it's off is pretty minor, and I'm not doing edge joinery, so I can probably squeak by on this project.
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Brian Siano wrote:


But you shouldn't push so hard that you raise the back surface of the boark off the table...all you need is to contact the fence to keep a smooth cut. If the shaft is perpendicular to the table as it should be, all is golden. It shouldn't be too hard to shim the fence to correct it, either.
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Maybe this is to late, but....
Joint 1st board, good side up (89 degs using your example) Joint 2nd board, good side down, (91 degs. when flipped) When joined, should be 180 degs
When I use my jointer, and do check for 90 degs, I still reverse the boards when edge joining.

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Easier way it to trim it on the table saw, turn the board and rip it to proper width and if the saw is properly set, you have two 90 degree sides, no remembering what is 89 or 91.
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