Porter Cable 314

I figured I'd get a PC 314. I don't have one of those and it looks like it would be pretty useful to me... However, several of the Amazon.com customer reviews mentioned that the blade was not parallel to the edges of the base. Obviously this would cause grief if using a straight edge to guide the saw while cutting sheet goods. Were these two reviews about fluke saws or have others here run into the same problem?
Thanks,
John
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I don't own a 314, but I do own a lot of Porter Cable tools. They all have been and continue to be excellent.
If you are wanting a worm drive, there are other choices but the PC is the small blade, useful for trim work.
Amazon reviewers aren't that reliable, IMHO.
John Grossbohlin wrote:

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I've got over a dozen PC tools myself. It's the "base parallel to blade" on the 314 about which I'm specifically interested in getting more information...
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Sure, it's a good idea to read Amazon reviews carefully and weed out ones that reviewed a different model, had some sort of agenda, or don't know what they are writing about. None of those apply to my comments on the 314 @ Amazon though. I have a reasonable amount of woodworking experience and try to write balanced and objective reviews.
The 314 I brought home from The Tool Shed (Gvl. SC) had a blade that was out of parallel with the base edge by about 1/32" across the blade length exposed at full cut depth. I did some test cuts guided by a straightedge and determined that this condition would be a functional problem - rough cuts and tough time holding the saw against the edge. 1/32" may not seem like much, but it is for a saw with blades this thin (1/16" kerf) and small (4 1/2").
I took the saw back to The Tool Shed. The manager inspected the saw and agreed that it was improperly manufactured. He also agreed that the saw's design prevented effective and easy correction of the condition. He popped a second one out of its box for me, we checked it and determined it to be properly aligned, and I went home with it. Been a good saw since.
Maybe the first saw I got was the only bum one they've ever made. Maybe the second one was the only good one. I'm sure the actual situation is somewhere between those extremes. I recommend the saw to other woodworkers, but suggest that it be checked carefully upon receipt.
Regards, Dave
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I have one and the base is VERY light weight...
This little saw CAN NOT be thrown around like it's bigger relatives or you will bend/knock the base out of alignment VERY easily. It is a wondeful little trim saw but a little more fragil than most PC tools.
It is NOT a honking big ass framing saw....
John Grossbohlin wrote:

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Its a fine little saw. If the base is out of parallel, and gets that way after it gets dropped. The fix is simple. Bend it back! It is afterall a lightweight base and can be moved easily.
You wont be framing a house but for trim work, its a fine saw.
Dave

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I got one a few years ago, and like it very much. It is great for breaking down sheet goods. I haven't done much research, but it seems limited to PC blades.

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Glad to hear others are pleased with the saw... I've got some PC tools that are close to 20 years old and some about four months old and have been pleased with them.
A 314 will be joining my collection. I can appreciate the need to take care with the saw so as to not damage the base. I don't see that as much of an issue... I haven't dropped a power tool in about 25 years. That drop was because scaffolding planks slipped under me while I was trimming plywood roof sheating on the edge of a gambrel roof. It was a choice: drop the saw some 16-18 feet to the ground or drop the saw and me some 16-18 feet to the ground. The saw lost that round. Oh, wait, I forgot about dropping the Dremel tool that burst into flames in my hands a few years after that. I dropped that tool but it was toast already so it didn't matter. ;-)
John
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