Planer groove

I have a nice Dewalt DW733 planer that I use occasionally, new blades but I'm having trouble with the first 2 or 3 inches showing a recess when the planer grabs the oak. (I think it's the feed end anyway).
Is there a trick to keep this from happening? I've tried using very shallow cuts but still getting it.
Even trying to sand these out is time consuming.
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by the way -- talking about a recess the entire width of the board.
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wrote:

having trouble with the first 2 or 3 inches showing a recess when the planer grabs the oak. (I think it's the feed end anyway).

It is known as "snipe"
First step is to lock the cutter head if it is not already.
There are a few tricks that work.
Be sure the in feed and out feed tables are aligned to each other. If possible, extend the tables for better support on longer boards.
Some people leave the board long and trim off the end couple of inches.
If you are planing more than one board, start one through the planer and when the back end gets near the in feed table, put the next board right up to it and push it along so it is like one long board. If you are doing narrow board that fit two or more across, make them run along side of each other, even if staggered.
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having trouble with the first 2 or 3 inches showing a recess when the planer grabs the oak. (I think it's the feed end anyway).

What Ed said:
http://newwoodworker.com/plnrsuprt.html
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just printed that out -- thanks. makes sense.
you hit on something though -- if I can't solve the problem, I'll just use boards 3 inches longer than I need.
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Right. It's a lot easier to machine boards after the boards are thicknessed, flat, and true. It's easier to make them shorter and narrower than longer and wider. ;-)
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On 7/7/2012 3:52 PM, mkr5000 wrote:

A good practice anyway as there are often splits on the ends of the boards that need to be cut off.
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Sounds like snipe. Extremely common on planers the size of the 733.
Put upward pressure on the end of the board as it's entering and exiting the planer. This will reduce and often eliminate the sniping.
What's happening is the board is only held in place by one feed roller, so it's able to move up and down. Putting upward pressure on the board pushes it down against the table and keeps it from moving until the second feed roller (on the other side of the knives) catches.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

This solution has worked for me with my Ridged planer. To clarify a bit, put upward pressure on the end of the board that is not in the planer. Art
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wrote:

having trouble with the first 2 or 3 inches showing a recess when the planer grabs the oak. (I think it's the feed end anyway).

Another trick some have used is to hot glue (or use superglue) longer strips to the outside edges of the board. They have to be a bit thicker than the board itself.
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