PICTURE -- Big vs. small impact wrench

Page 1 of 4  
Somewhat amusing.
http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/packing/Ingersoll-Rand-Impact/Ingersoll-Rand-Impact-0001.jpg
--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

http://igor.chudov.com/tmp/packing/Ingersoll-Rand-Impact/Ingersoll-Rand-Impact-0001.jpg
What I would like to see is the second picture.
The one that shows the big fella who operates that big impact driver versus a normal size guy.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'd like to see a 1/2" hex impact socket for the Big one ! Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net TSRA, Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
Lee Michaels wrote:

----== Posted via Pronews.Com - Unlimited-Unrestricted-Secure Usenet News==---- http://www.pronews.com The #1 Newsgroup Service in the World! >100,000 Newsgroups ---= - Total Privacy via Encryption =---
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The big one, is usually operated by 2 burly men.
--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually the big impacts are easy to handle if you can pick them up. I have used 1" impact drives on 18 wheeler truck wheels and they are no harder to use than a 1/2". Because they are impact drives they will not transfer the torque to your hands and or arms like a direct drive drill.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A 1/2" Skill drill will deliver much more feed back to the operator than a 1/2" impact that is operating corectly. The whole idea of the impact driver is to deliver impact pulses that loosen or tighten rather than a continuious feed of power. In the tire business I often used a 1" impact with little effort other than simply holding the tool. Beccause of the weight of the tool a 1/2" impact wrench gave the operator more feed back than the 1" impact wrench.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That, however, is not true for larger impacts. These are real monsters when operated with adequate air supply.
--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:my beer and watch this!")

Do you have personal experience with larger impacts? The whole idea to the pneumatic impact is to enable a person to handle larger applications with out great effort. The only thing that I see different would be that the larger 2.5" impact would simply be harder to pick up and position. Its greater size would probably require 2 people to handle it but beyond that pulling the trigger should not exert much more effort on the operator.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I have very little experience. I handled two large impacts (both for selling on ebay as I have no need for them).
One was a 1.5" splined I-R impact (sold to a rec.crafts.metalworking member). Another was that 2.5" impact.
I did not have enough air to spin up that 2.5 impact to full speed. But I did have enough air to spin up the 1.5" impact. I held it as tightly as I could, and still it almost jumped out of my hands.
--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ignoramus29659 wrote: ...

Spinning it free isn't the same as having it on a piece of work, but they still have torque...
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

An impact that "does not work properly will be tough to hold on to". I have a 3/8" air ratchet that is holder to hold on to than the 1" that I used to use. Needless to say the 3/8" ratchet does not work properly. ;~(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 13 Jun 2008 14:40:14 -0500, "Leon"

Most air ratchets are not impact tools.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I would not say most, many are not, mine was but needed to be service many years ago. Most all the mechaics that worked for me used air ratchets that acted as impacts also.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 14 Jun 2008 09:31:26 -0500, "Leon"

Hmmmm.... Learn something new every day. The only ones I have ever seen were basically just a turbine & gear reduction.
-- "We need to make a sacrifice to the gods, find me a young virgin... oh, and bring something to kill"
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Actually,
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually,
A recent design combines an impact wrench and an air ratchet, often called a "reactionless air ratchet" [4] by the manufacturers, incorporating an impact assembly before the ratchet assembly. Such a design allows very high output torques with minimal effort on the operator, and prevents the common injury of slamming one's knuckles into some part of the equipment when the fastener tightens down and the torque suddenly increases. Specialty designs are available for certain applications, such as removing crankshaft pullies without removing the radiator in a vehicle.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I have experience with the larger wrenches, and posted such experience, and you pooh poohed me. Let's hear about your experience, and please omit the phrase "should not".
Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was not trying to prove you wrong, but the picture of the 2 impacts show an pneumatic 1/2" impact and I would assume also that the larger one is pneumatic also. You mentioned Hydraulic Impacts, those I have no experience with at all. You also mentioned a comparison to your 1/2" Skil drill. There is no comparison what so ever between a direct drive drill and an impact driver. For years when in the automotive business I use 1/2" impacts and they only require the effort to hold the tool. Perhaps 1~2 % of the force feeds back to the operator as opposed to a 1/2" drill where 100% is delivered back to the operator. On numerous occasions I used a 1" impact to remove lug nut from "Large" equipment, obviously not as large as the 2.5" tools is capable of handling but in my 35+ years of experience with properly working impact drives the bigger the capacity 1/4", 3/8", 1/2", and 1" there was no difference in feed back to the operator once in place one hand to pull the trigger was all that is needed to prevent the tool from spinning. Weight was the only difference in my experience. "A properly working impact Should Not deliver much if any feed back to the operator. An inferior or an "in need of servicing" unit may not provide the operator with proper buffer from the toque. Impacts deliver thousands of on/off impulses that accomplish loosening or tightening nuts and bolts. If the tool has an internal air leak it can bypass the hammering/impact mode and simply try to spin continuously, that is when the impact would require more effort from the operator.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
    [ ... ]

    And perhaps spinning it up *without* a load would quickly accelerate the square drive and some internal parts to full speed without using the impact, thus transferring more to the user's hands -- which could explain Iggy's experience. He did not say that he had it on an appropriate nut load -- but that it did try to twist out of his hands. (The 1" or 1-1/2" one, not the 2-1/2" one IIRC.)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No load, no nut.
Here's the old video of that impact spinning up.
http://yabe.algebra.com/~ichudov/misc/ebay/Ingersoll-Rand-Impact-Wrench/divx.video.avi
I held it as hard as I could.
--
Due to extreme spam originating from Google Groups, and their inattention
to spammers, I and many others block all articles originating
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.